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Is there any disease that prevents a person from being angry?

Is there any disease that prevents a person from being angry?



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Is there any disease that prevents a person from being angry? As a reference, the resection of the amygdala reduces feelings of fear.

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Short answer
Brain damage is typically associated with increased expression of anger and aggressive behavior. I wasn't able to find any paper reporting lack of anger expression after brain damage. Great question!

Background
Assuming you are after symptoms associated with brain damage, I have put my efforts into writing up an answer on brain trauma and anger. To strat with your example of the amygdala - indeed, removal of the amygdala (amygdalectomy) has been used to treat extreme feelings fear. Damage to the amygdala reults in deficits in facial emotion recognition. Specifically they have impaired recognition of expressions of fear and guilt and trustworthiness. These findings suggest that the amygdala has a critical role in face emotion processing (Elliott et al., 2011).

Anger is thought to be mediated by the medial amygdaloidal areas that connect to the medial hypothalamus via the stria terminalis, and from there to the dorsal half of the periaqueductal gray. Aggression (the expression of anger) evoked by stimulation of the amygdala is dependent on the functional integrity of the medial hypothalamus and the periaqueductal gray. However, aggression evoked by stimulation of the periaqueductal gray is not dependent on the functional integrity of the amygdala. The amygdala-hypothalamus-periaqueductal gray is thought to mediate reactive aggression (Blair, 2013).

Hence, it seems that a likely candidate for the obliteration of feelings of anger is the periaqueductal gray. Does damage or removal of this structure reduces feelings of anger? Lesions in this area of the brain have been associated with loss of speech in humans (Esposito et al, 1999), reduced fear in rats (Lonstein & Stern, 1997), and upon complete destruction it resulted in a limp inertness in cats (Bailey & Davis, 1943). The Lonstein & Stern (1997) paper reports that

[Periaqueductal gray] lesioned rats attacked a strange male twice as often as controls did, which is suggestive of reduced fearfulness. These results extend the known roles of the PAG [periaqueductal gray] in [] defensive behaviors.

Hence, removal of PAG actually increases aggressive behavior (reduces fear), rather than decreasing aggressive behavior!

In all, I wasn't able to find any study that reports on brain damage that results in a reduction of anger expression. Indeed, brain damage is often related to increased feelings of anger and there the track record is extensive

References
- Bailey & Davis, *Proc Soc Exp Biol Med (1942); 51: 305-6
- Blair, Wiley Interdiscip Rev Cogn Sci (2012); 3(1): 65-74
- Elliott et al., Neuropsychopharmacology (2011); 36(1): 153-82
- Esposito et all., NeuroReport (1999); 10(4): 681-5
- Lonstein & Stern, J Neurosci (1997); 17(9): 3364-78


How to Switch Off an Angry Person

Any time I see people having angry altercations, I perk up my ears and observe intently. I watch their displays, not in a sadistic or feeling superior kind of way, but fascinated with how it unfolds: &ldquoWill it work for them? Are they going to get what they want with this approach&rdquo?

I have practically never seen it work, not during my observations in therapy or in personal life.

Even on rare occasions where it seems to work in the moment, yielding some win-loss resolution, it never works sustainably. Peace can never be found on a shaky and fake foundation of emotional tyranny. As humorist Kin Hubbard said, &ldquonobody ever forgets where he buried a hatchet.&rdquo

Here are some strategies for dealing with difficult people, organized around the main psychological premises driving their anger: fear and need for control.

Disengage and don&rsquot take it personally.

People are energy-conserving creatures. Just as most animals attack out of self-defense, hunger or other biological needs, human anger also is goal-driven. Most people, even most violent individuals, don&rsquot walk around the majority of the day attacking and abusing others. They lash out in spurts.

Behind their violent shield, a threatening individual is feeling threatened &mdash maybe not by you, but by something or someone. Their anger is related to you only in a way in which some action or expressed feeling of yours has triggered some discomforting emotion within them.

Threatening individuals commonly are overwhelmed and scared. Big bullies have deeply hurt and vulnerable cores. They are expending their toxic energy to produce their angry display as a distorted way to pursue some goal related to their personal sense of safety and significance. Even though the content may be channeled at you, the driving force behind it is related to their personality, upbringing, and prior experiences. Most of their accusations are based on subjective opinions and are very loosely, or not at all, related to you personally.

Avoid ego battles and rides to the past.

When it comes to aggression, an unfortunate point of difference between humans and less evolved mammals is the ego. Some people are willing to put their life on the line and injure another person physically or emotionally to protect their ego and restore their injured self-esteem. Inflated egos are most vulnerable to the slightest pokes and scratches, which is a common infliction of defensive and confrontational people.

Remember that ego injuries are always the deeds of the past. This is why the great focus of most angry people, when they are arguing, will be buried in the past. Therefore, at all costs, avoid accompanying them on their voyage there. Drain them by letting them give a monologue about their expired accusations. Avoid discussing with them about who did what, when and why, and how it made them feel, but repeatedly ask how they propose solving this problem now.

Remember also that most angry people have a victim mentality. They perpetually feel the world owes them something and other people must fulfill their preferences or needs. What angry people say is almost never factual but emotional in content, related to their fears, frustrations, and bruised ego. Attempting to talk with them almost always fails, as raging people are narrowly focused, entitled, and prone to listening only to themselves.

Choose calm and sanity.

An angry person is looking for a fight. Through their escalation and unfair accusations, they are asking you to engage. As Eric Hoffer said, &ldquorudeness is the weak man&rsquos imitation of strength.&rdquo

So, what is needed in the presence of a hot-headed person? A cool-headed person. The constructive response is not to indulge them in any action. When they shout, you keep silent or speak softly. When they come close, you increase the distance. When they say a lot, you say nothing or very little. Some people decide to respond, thinking that ignoring a provocation makes them lose and a bully to win. This is contrary to what actually happens. You win by disengaging. You become untouchable and gain control by increasing emotional and physical space.

Imagine this situation: You are on a road and the driver in front of you drives dangerously and erratically, swaying wildly sideways, speeding up and pressing the brakes, honking randomly. Should you catch up, open up your window and attempt a discussion on proper driving? Of course not. You shift lanes and drive away, quietly demonstrating your intelligence and preference for safety. De-escalate the angry person in a similar manner, by exiting the scene emotionally or physically, not participating in their drama.

Remember also that basic defenses of angry, self-justifying people are projection and denial. You tell them that they are scaring you with their shouting, they say you are the one yelling. You tell them their words are hurtful, they tell you that you told them things ten times worse, plus you are the one who made them angry to begin with. So, what are the ways to negotiate with reality distorters? The short answer is &ldquothere are none,&rdquo and the longer answer is, &ldquoThere are none, don&rsquot even try.&rdquo

Give out an imaginary cupcake.

Cupcakes are sweet , peaceful, calming and smile-inducing. Raging people often are in dire need of an imaginary cupcake. A big part of their anger is driven by their belief or feeling that they never get any or someone stole or damaged their cupcakes. So, generously give them one or even a couple, even when they seem to be undeserving of any sweetness.

Despite the obnoxious behavior, loud shouting, screeching voices, clenching fists, pointing fingers, red faces and all, most angry people have a sad message. Most likely they are trying to tell you that they are feeling hurt, ignored, disrespected, unappreciated and unloved.

Listening and responding to these needs calmly and emphatically can serve as the key to getting more cooperation from emotionally agitated people. Just say &ldquoI think I understand what is going on here, but feel free to correct me, my friend&rdquo and so on. Then offer some reflective listening, validating their concerns to an extent. Tell them something nice and peaceful. Agree with them in theory. Do not assign any blame or argue. Establish a basic premise for peace by appealing in some way to the dormant, healthy side of their personality by extending to them some sense of grace, validation, and acceptance.


How Anger Fires Up the Heart

Emotions such as anger and hostility ramp up your "fight or flight” response. When that happens, stress hormones, including adrenaline and cortisol, speed up your heart rate and breathing.

You get a burst of energy. Your blood vessels tighten. Your blood pressure soars.

Continued

You’re ready to run for your life or fight an enemy. If this happens often, it causes wear and tear on your artery walls.

In one report, researchers found that healthy people who are often angry or hostile are 19% more likely than calmer people to get heart disease. Among people with heart disease, those who usually feel angry or hostile fared worse than others.

So if anger has you in its crosshairs, it’s time to shift the way you react to it.


Feeling angry: Mental health and what to do

Anger is a normal emotion that everyone experiences from time to time. However, if a person feels unable to control their anger, it can cause problems in relationships and at work. It might also affect their quality of life.

Anger is an integral part of the body’s “fight, flight, or freeze” system, which helps protect us from threats or danger.

However, high levels of unresolved anger may have a negative impact on health. According to the American Psychological Association, anger has links with inflammation in older adults. This could lead to chronic diseases.

Research from 2015 suggests that the overall lifetime prevalence of intense, inappropriate, or poorly controlled anger in the general population in the United States is 7.8%. Anger seems to affect more men than women, and it also seems more prevalent among younger adults.

This article looks at the potential causes of anger, how to self-manage it, possible treatments and therapies, and when to see a doctor.

Share on Pinterest Problems relating to a specific person may trigger feelings of anger.

People can become angry for many reasons, and everyone experiences anger differently.

Events or circumstances that cause an angry outburst in one person may not affect another person at all.

Someone might experience anger if they feel:

  • attacked or threatened
  • deceived
  • frustrated or powerless
  • invalidated or unfairly treated
  • disrespected

Circumstances that may trigger feelings that lead to anger include:

  • problems that a specific person, such as a coworker, partner, friend, or family member, has caused
  • frustrating events, such as being stuck in a traffic jam or having a flight canceled
  • personal problems that cause extreme worry or ruminating
  • memories of traumatic or infuriating events
  • physical or psychological pain
  • environmental conditions, such as uncomfortable temperatures
  • feeling that goals are unachievable
  • personal offense due to unfair treatment, insults, rejections, and criticism

Anger can also play a significant role in grief. Many people feel angry when they are dealing with losing a partner, close friend, or family member.

The signs and symptoms of anger can vary from person to person. Anger affects the mind and body in a variety of ways.

Effects that anger may have on the body include:

  • increased heart rate
  • feeling hot
  • sweating
  • tightness in the chest
  • stomach churning
  • clenching jaws or grinding teeth
  • tense muscles
  • shaking or trembling
  • leg weakness
  • feeling faint

Effects that anger may have on the mind include feeling:

  • anxious, nervous, or unable to relax
  • easily irritated
  • guilty
  • sad or depressed
  • resentful
  • humiliated
  • like striking out physically or verbally

Other behaviors and feelings associated with anger include:

  • pacing
  • becoming sarcastic
  • losing sense of humor
  • shouting
  • yelling, screaming, or crying
  • acting in an abusive manner
  • craving substances such as alcohol or tobacco

Physical, emotional, and behavioral cues can help a person recognize when they are experiencing the intermediate stages between low and extreme anger levels.

It is important to note that anger and aggression are different things. Anger is an emotion, whereas aggression is related to how a person behaves.

Not everyone with anger behaves aggressively, and not everyone who acts aggressively is angry.

Anger itself is not classified as a mental disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM–5). For this reason, there are no diagnostic criteria for anger issues.

However, anger is associated with many mental health conditions, including:

  • antisocial personality disorder
  • attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • conduct disorder
  • intermittent explosive disorder
  • oppositional defiant disorder

Feeling angry is not always a sign of a mental health condition, but speaking to a doctor can help a person determine the underlying cause.

Everyone has a reaction to anger, but some techniques can help ensure the anger does not get out of control.

Strategies for managing anger include:

  • Recognizing the warning signs. Being aware of the changes in the body, emotions, and behaviors that result from anger can help someone decide how they want to react to a situation before they act.
  • Pausing before reacting. Walking away from the situation can buy the person some time to think and take back control.
  • Counting to 10. Taking a few seconds to count slowly to 10 can reduce the intensity of the anger.
  • Releasing tension in the body. To release tension, unclench the jaw, drop the shoulders, and uncross the arms and legs. Roll the shoulders back and stretch the neck to either side if holding tension here.
  • Listening. It can be easy to jump to conclusions when angry. If having a heated discussion, take some time to stop and listen before replying.
  • Exercising. Doing cardiovascular exercises such as running, cycling, or swimming can help release the energy that might otherwise become aggression.
  • Finding a distraction. Listening to music, dancing, going for a walk, writing in a journal, or just taking a shower can all help prevent anger from escalating.
  • Changing negative thought patterns. In the heat of the moment, the situation can seem much worse than it really is. A method called cognitive restructuring can help people challenge and replace angry thoughts.
  • Using relaxation techniques. Using relaxation strategies, such as deep breathing and progressive muscle relaxation, may help alleviate feelings of anger.

If a person’s anger is affecting their relationships, work, and other areas of their life, they may wish to seek advice from a doctor.

Indicators that anger has become a problem include:

  • regularly expressing anger through disruptive or destructive behavior
  • feeling as though anger is having an impact on physical or mental health
  • experiencing anger more often than other emotions

Some of the disruptive ways a person might express anger include:

  • Aggression and violence: This can include shouting, swearing, throwing things, and being verbally abusive, threatening, or physically violent.
  • Internal aggression: This can include self-harming, self-hatred, not eating, and isolating oneself.
  • Passive aggression: This can include ignoring people, refusing to do tasks, and being sarcastic but not explicitly saying anything angry or aggressive.

In these cases, it is important to seek support and treatment. Expressing anger through aggression and violence can harm friendships, family relationships, and relationships with coworkers, and it may have serious consequences.


Psychology of controlling people

An extreme behavior often satisfies an extreme, underlying need. When people push themselves strongly in one direction, it’s because they’re being pulled by something in the opposite direction.

Control freaks have a strong need to control others because they believe they lack control themselves. So excessive need to control means the person is lacking control somehow in their own life.

Now ‘lack of control’ is a very broad phrase. It includes every possible aspect of life that a person may want to control but find that they don’t, or can’t. But the general rule stays constant- a person will only turn into a control freak if they think they lack control over any aspect of their life.

Anything that a person is unable to control in their life can induce feelings of lacking control. These feelings motivate them to regain control over that apparently uncontrollable thing. That’s totally fine because that’s exactly how many emotions are designed to work- signaling us that some need needs to be met.

Instead of regaining control over the thing they lost control over in the first place, some people try to regain control over other irrelevant areas of their lives.

If a person feels they lack control over X, instead of regaining control over X, they try to control Y. Y is usually something easier to control in their environments like furniture or other people.

For instance, if a person feels they lack control in their job, instead of regaining control in their work-life, they might try to regain it by moving furniture or interfering unhealthily in their kids’ lives.

The default tendency of the human mind is to seek the shortest and easiest path to reach a goal.

After all, to regain feelings of control, it’s much easier to move furniture or shout at kids than to face the major life problem and work through it.


7 Ways Anger Is Ruining Your Health

Constantly losing your cool can hurt more than your relationships.

Sometimes anger can be good for you, if it's addressed quickly and expressed in a healthy way. In fact, anger may help some people think more rationally. However, unhealthy episodes of anger — when you hold it in for long periods of time, turn it inward, or explode in rage — can wreak havoc on your body. If you're prone to losing your temper, here are seven important reasons to stay calm.

1. An angry outburst puts your heart at great risk. Most physically damaging is anger's effect on your cardiac health. “In the two hours after an angry outburst, the chance of having a heart attack doubles,” says Chris Aiken, MD, an instructor in clinical psychiatry at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine and director of the Mood Treatment Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

“Repressed anger — where you express it indirectly or go to great lengths to control it, is associated with heart disease,” says Dr. Aiken. In fact, one study found that people with anger proneness as a personality trait were at twice the risk of coronary disease than their less angry peers.

To protect your ticker, identify and address your feelings before you lose control. “Constructive anger — the kind where you speak up directly to the person you are angry with and deal with the frustration in a problem-solving manner — is not associated with heart disease,” and is actually a very normal, healthy emotion, says Aiken.

2. Anger ups your stroke risk. If you’re prone to lashing out, beware. One study found there was a three times higher risk of having a stroke from a blood clot to the brain or bleeding within the brain during the two hours after an angry outburst. For people with an aneurysm in one of the brain’s arteries, there was a six times higher risk of rupturing this aneurysm following an angry outburst.

Some good news: You can learn to control those angry explosions. “To move into positive coping, you need to first identify what your triggers, and then figure out how to change your response,” says Mary Fristad, PhD, a professor of psychiatry and psychology at the Ohio State University. Instead of losing your temper, “Do some deep breathing. Use assertive communication skills. You might even need to change your environment by getting up and walking away,” says Dr. Fristad.

3. It weakens your immune system. If you're mad all the time, you just might find yourself feeling sick more often. In one study, Harvard University scientists found that in healthy people, simply recalling an angry experience from their past caused a six-hour dip in levels of the antibody immunoglobulin A, the cells’ first line of defense against infection.

If you're someone who's habitually angry, protect your immune system by turning to a few effective coping strategies. “Assertive communication, effective problem solving, using humor, or restructuring your thoughts to get away from that black-and-white, all-or-nothing thinking — those are all good ways to cope,” says Fristad. “But you've got to start by calming down.”

4. Anger problems can make your anxiety worse. If you’re a worrier, it’s important to note that anxiety and anger can go hand-in-hand. In a 2012 study published in the journal Cognitive Behavior Therapy, researchers found that anger can exacerbate symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), a condition characterized by an excessive and uncontrollable worry that interferes with a person’s daily life. Not only were higher levels of anger found in people with GAD, but hostility — along with internalized, unexpressed anger in particular — contributed greatly to the severity of GAD symptoms.

5. Anger is also linked to depression. Numerous studies have linked depression with aggression and angry outbursts, especially in men. “In depression, passive anger — where you ruminate about it but never take action — is common,” says Aiken. His No. 1 piece of advice for someone struggling with depression mixed with anger is to get busy and stop thinking so much.

“Any activity which fully absorbs you is a good cure for anger, such as golf, needlepoint, biking,” he says. “These tend to fill our minds completely and pull our focus toward the present moment, and there's just no room left for anger to stir when you've got that going.”

6. Hostility can hurt your lungs. Not a smoker? You still could be hurting your lungs if you're a perpetually angry, hostile person. A group of Harvard University scientists studied 670 men over eight years using a hostility scale scoring method to measure anger levels and assessed any changes in the men's lung function. The men with the highest hostility ratings had significantly worse lung capacity, which increased their risk of respiratory problems. The researchers theorized that an uptick in stress hormones, which are associated with feelings of anger, creates inflammation in the airways.

7. Anger can shorten your life. Is it really true that happy people live longer? “Stress is very tightly linked to general health. If you're stressed and angry, you'll shorten your lifespan,” says Fristad. A University of Michigan study done over a 17-year period found that couples who hold in their anger have a shorter life span than those who readily say when they're mad.

If you're not someone who's comfortable showing negative emotions, then work with a therapist or practice on your own to be more expressive. “Learning to express anger in an appropriate way is actually a healthy use of anger,” says Fristad. “If someone infringes on your rights, you need to tell them. Directly tell people what you're mad about, and what you need,” she says.


Warning Signs of an Anger Issue

How can you spot an anger problem?

“When it occurs too frequently, when the intensity is too strong, or when it endures too long,” says Howard Kassinove, PhD, director of Hofstra University's Institute for the Study and Treatment of Anger and Aggression. He also co-wrote “Anger Management for Everyone: Seven Proven Ways to Control Anger and Live a Happier Life.”

Kassinove sees degrees of anger: annoyance, anger, and rage. Occasionally feeling annoyed or even angry is nothing to worry about.

“Most people report that they get angry once or twice a week,” Kassinove says, “but people who rate high for the anger trait become angry about once a day. Holding on to anger for too long is another sign of trouble. We see patients who are still angry at people who died years ago.”

Looking closely at yourself can help. “People may ask themselves, 'Am I alone? Have I lost jobs, lost friends, lost family because of my anger?'” Abrams says.

Continued

In most cases, though, people are usually blind to their own issues, he says. Denial is common, too. Usually, it’s someone else who persuades them to seek help.

“Many people will say things like: 'There is nothing wrong with me. Somebody else or something else is causing me to be angry.'”

Kassinove agrees. “The first step is understanding that anger is caused by how you interpret an event. No one can force you to be angry," he says. "Once you recognize that, you are in charge of your own anger.”


Birthmarks

A 2012 study found children with rare birthmarks called Congenital Melanocytic Naevi were more likely to have the MC1R mutation that causes red hair than children without the birthmarks.

Congenital Melanocytic Naevi are brown or black birthmarks that can cover up to 80 percent of the body. About 1 in 20,000 children have large or multiple CMN.

Study researcher Dr. Veronica Kinsler, of Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, said: "If you have red hair in your family, these findings should not worry you, as changes in the red hair gene are common, but large CMN are very rare. So the changes do not cause the CMN to happen, but just increase the risk."


Oppositional defiant disorder

Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) [1] is listed in the DSM-5 under Disruptive, impulse-control, and conduct disorders and defined as "a pattern of angry/irritable mood, argumentative/defiant behavior, or vindictiveness" in children and adolescents. [2] This behavior is usually targeted toward peers, parents, teachers, and other authority figures. [3] Unlike children with conduct disorder (CD), children with oppositional defiant disorder are not aggressive towards people or animals, do not destroy property, and do not show a pattern of theft or deceit. [4] It has certain links to ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) and as much as one half of children with ODD will also diagnose as having ADHD as well. [5] [6] [7]

Oppositional defiant disorder
SpecialtyPsychiatry, clinical psychology
Usual onsetchildhood or adolescence
TreatmentCognitive behavioral therapy, family therapy, intervention (counseling)


Demographics

As of 2002, it has not been possible to determine the number of people with PPD with any accuracy. This lack of data might be expected for a disorder that is characterized by extreme suspiciousness. Such patients in many cases avoid voluntary contact with such people as mental health workers who have a certain amount of power over them. There are, nonetheless, some estimates of the prevalence of PPD. According to the DSM-IV-TR , between 0.5% and 2.5% of the general population of the United States may have PPD, while 2%&ndash10% of outpatients receiving psychiatric care may be affected. A significant percentage of institutionalized psychiatric patients, between 10% and 30%, might have symptoms that qualify for a diagnosis of PPD. Finally, the disorder appears to be more common in men than in women.

There are indications in the scientific literature that relatives of patients with chronic schizophrenia may have a greater chance of developing PPD than people in the general population. Also, the incidence of the disorder may be higher among relatives of patients suffering from another psychotic disorder known as delusional disorder of the persecutory type.


What Is Anger? Definition & Psychology Behind This Emotion

Anger is defined as "a strong feeling of annoyance, displeasure, or hostility." It's important to note that anger is a normal, universal human emotion. There are a series of instances and events in life which can cause someone to become angry. Typically, anger arises when someone feels threatened, disturbed, or otherwise interrupted from a peaceful emotional state. Anger can also be combined with other emotions, such as jealousy, sadness, or hopelessness.

There are many misconceptions surrounding anger. One of the most common misconceptions is that anger is a bad emotion. Anger isn't a bad emotion however, when someone isn't able to manage their anger in an appropriate way, bad things can happen. To date, there are countless stories of people losing relationships, careers and even their lives because of the way they handled their anger.

Psychology Of Anger

Understanding the psychology of anger will provide a lot of insight into this emotion and what it's truly all about. First and foremost, the American Psychology Association states that anger is generated towards a person or thing which one perceives as having wronged them in one way or another. Anger is not always negative, though it can sometimes serve as inspiration for people to take action or overcome certain fears.

Of course, there are some negatives associated with anger, particularly if this emotion is ongoing or recurring for very long periods. Anger can lead to damaged relationships, lower quality of life, and even health issues, such as higher blood pressure and other tolls on a person's mental and physical health. The negative aftereffects which are associated with repeated and ongoing anger are reasons why controlling anger is so important.

Controlling Anger

Anger may be an inevitable emotion which humans feel from time to time, but this doesn't mean that we are powerless to control it. By having a grasp on anger, we can ensure that this emotion doesn't fester and become strong enough to control us. Believe it or not, one of the first steps towards controlling anger is acknowledging its existence. Many people have issues with admitting that they are angry this is especially problematic because no issue can be fixed or dealt with until it's at least addressed.

You never want to be in a position where you find yourself unable to control feelings of anger. Being in this place means that anger has controlled you, which is only a recipe for disaster. When someone is unable to control their anger, they tend to lash out and otherwise do things which they will regret later. Anger is not an inherently bad emotion, but when anger controls you instead of you controlling it, this is when danger arrives.

Thankfully, there are a multitude of ways in which you can control your anger. First comes acknowledging the fact that you are angry. This may sound absurdly basic, but there is a stunning amount of people who refuse even to admit how they're feeling. This is especially problematic because no issue can be resolved unless it's first acknowledged. No matter how annoyed, agitated or angry you're feeling, it's important to remember to acknowledge the way you feel.

Once you've acknowledged feelings of anger, you can then begin to assess them. Why are you angry? What's bothering you? Is your anger a result of feeling threatened or scared? In most scenarios, it won't be that difficult to know why you are angry. When people experience feelings of anger, there is almost always a person, event, decision or another trigger which sets them off.

There are so many other strategies which can be used to manage anger&mdashdeep breathing, removing yourself from the situation, and even making certain lifestyle changes, if necessary. Of course, certain solutions are better than others, but there are deeper ways of managing and controlling your anger. Ultimately, these deeper methods each involve getting to the root of your anger, and in many cases, this is easier said than done.

The Root Of Anger

Understanding the root of your anger makes all the difference. Anger can be a very complex emotion and sometimes, it's an aftereffect of previous issues which haven't been resolved. There are many situations when people resort to anger to conceal emotions which may make them feel more vulnerable, such as sadness, jealousy or disappointment. In other scenarios, ongoing anger may serve as a manifestation of an underlying problem from a long time ago or even childhood.

At the end of the day, having a firm grasp on the root of your anger makes all the difference. Sometimes, anger really can be simply the result of a person or situation, but if you are constantly feeling angry, then this is may be indicative of a larger issue. This larger issue could be a poor relationship, a lifestyle choice, a toxic environment, etc. Regardless of what it may be, you're going to need to get to the bottom of it if you are serious about bettering yourself and freeing yourself from habitual anger.

Patterns exist throughout all facets of life. They manifest in relationships, career choices, and so much more. Patterns are also dominant themes in emotional states and feelings. When dealing with anger, it's important to be cognizant of patterns and the roles which they play in your feelings. One of the most revealing things about patterns is that they provide insight into who you are, your choices, and whether certain changes are in order.

If you find that you are constantly feeling angry around certain people or in certain environments, then this is a very negative pattern which requires a change. Remember, people and environments who are good for you will not constantly cause you to feel angry or otherwise unhappy. Sometimes, we must make tough decisions now which allows us to grow and evolve in the long run.

Pitfalls Of Ongoing Anger

The definition and psychology of anger have been explored and well-documented. Even such, there are still many people who fail to realize the pitfalls which are associated with ongoing states of anger and discontentment. Anger can ruin opportunities, destroy families, and prevent people from having experiences which would be good for them and help them grow.

Ongoing anger is not a positive state of being. As the old saying goes, like attracts like. If you are constantly in a state of anger, you will attract additional things to be angry about. The way you feel on a daily, regular basis matters, and it sets the tone for so many things in your life. It determines how you go about life, how others perceive you, the manner in which you interact with people, and so much more. The ultimate pitfall of ongoing anger is robbing yourself of an amazing quality of life which could be available to you.

If You Struggle With Managing Anger

Being cognizant of patterns, taking note of triggers, and noticing patterns is all well and good. However, there are certain situations where people do their best and yet still struggle to manage their anger. Generally, a person who has trouble with their anger may lash out at others or otherwise behave in self-destructive ways when things aren't working out in the ways which they would like.

The pitfalls of going down this road have already been established which is why anger management therapy can be so helpful. Anger management therapy allows you to work with a professional, get to the bottom of your anger, and deal with this emotion in positive and constructive ways. The goal of anger management is not to eradicate anger as an emotion or to never feel angry. There will always be situations which cause anger, but how you handle them will determine so much.

Sometimes there is shame or stigma attached to the idea of taking anger management courses. Some people feel embarrassed regarding their struggle with controlling themselves when they are angry. Others feel as though they should be able to do it on their own without the guidance of a professional. In different scenarios, the ego is a factor. No matter what it is, the reality is that anger management therapy can prove to be very helpful. Counselors and therapists are in the business of assisting people and getting them on track to living their best lives, not judging them.

Managing Anger With BetterHelp

An increasingly large number of studies suggest that online therapy can help those experiencing complicated feelings related to anger. In a study published in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, a peer-reviewed medical journal, researchers looked at the effects of online therapy for those experiencing problematic anger. They found that participants showed significantly decreased feelings of anger after only a brief treatment. This result is consistent with the findings from numerous recent studies showing that online therapy can help manage symptoms of varied mental health issues. It is widely considered a more accessible form of treatment, as it circumvents many common barriers, including high costs, time and geographical constraints, and perceived stigma.

As outlined above, if you&rsquore experiencing high levels of anger, online counseling can help you work through its sources and triggers. With BetterHelp, you&rsquoll be able to participate in online therapy from the comfort of your home (or wherever you have an internet connection). So, you can attend sessions without the potential stress of dealing with traffic, sitting in a crowded waiting room, or skipping lunch. The qualified mental health professionals at BetterHelp can give you anger management techniques that work. Read below for reviews of counselors, from those who have experienced similar issues.

Counselor Reviews

&ldquoI'm happy I had counseling with Glenn. I used to struggle with anger and trust issues towards my husband when I first talked to Glenn. He listened to me attentively and asked questions delicately and politely. I felt that he cared about my case and really wanted to help me. And he did help me solve my relationship problems. Glenn taught me to forgive, manage conflicts, and express and receive love. Now I enjoy my close and intimate relationship with my loved one, and there's no place for anger and hate in me anymore. Finally I feel understood, supported, happy and calm. And I'm so thankful to Glenn for guiding me there.&rdquo

&ldquoRegina helped me pinpoint where my anger issue stemmed from in the very first session, and has been helping me become more self aware of my warning triggers. Very insightful and helpful!&rdquo

If you feel as though you are going through a tough time in life, then therapy may prove to be helpful. Whether you're struggling with anger or dealing with another matter entirely, it's important for you to understand that you are not alone. At the end of the day, we all go through tough times, but dealing with them and continuing to push forward is what ultimately matters.


Psychology of controlling people

An extreme behavior often satisfies an extreme, underlying need. When people push themselves strongly in one direction, it’s because they’re being pulled by something in the opposite direction.

Control freaks have a strong need to control others because they believe they lack control themselves. So excessive need to control means the person is lacking control somehow in their own life.

Now ‘lack of control’ is a very broad phrase. It includes every possible aspect of life that a person may want to control but find that they don’t, or can’t. But the general rule stays constant- a person will only turn into a control freak if they think they lack control over any aspect of their life.

Anything that a person is unable to control in their life can induce feelings of lacking control. These feelings motivate them to regain control over that apparently uncontrollable thing. That’s totally fine because that’s exactly how many emotions are designed to work- signaling us that some need needs to be met.

Instead of regaining control over the thing they lost control over in the first place, some people try to regain control over other irrelevant areas of their lives.

If a person feels they lack control over X, instead of regaining control over X, they try to control Y. Y is usually something easier to control in their environments like furniture or other people.

For instance, if a person feels they lack control in their job, instead of regaining control in their work-life, they might try to regain it by moving furniture or interfering unhealthily in their kids’ lives.

The default tendency of the human mind is to seek the shortest and easiest path to reach a goal.

After all, to regain feelings of control, it’s much easier to move furniture or shout at kids than to face the major life problem and work through it.


Oppositional defiant disorder

Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) [1] is listed in the DSM-5 under Disruptive, impulse-control, and conduct disorders and defined as "a pattern of angry/irritable mood, argumentative/defiant behavior, or vindictiveness" in children and adolescents. [2] This behavior is usually targeted toward peers, parents, teachers, and other authority figures. [3] Unlike children with conduct disorder (CD), children with oppositional defiant disorder are not aggressive towards people or animals, do not destroy property, and do not show a pattern of theft or deceit. [4] It has certain links to ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) and as much as one half of children with ODD will also diagnose as having ADHD as well. [5] [6] [7]

Oppositional defiant disorder
SpecialtyPsychiatry, clinical psychology
Usual onsetchildhood or adolescence
TreatmentCognitive behavioral therapy, family therapy, intervention (counseling)


Feeling angry: Mental health and what to do

Anger is a normal emotion that everyone experiences from time to time. However, if a person feels unable to control their anger, it can cause problems in relationships and at work. It might also affect their quality of life.

Anger is an integral part of the body’s “fight, flight, or freeze” system, which helps protect us from threats or danger.

However, high levels of unresolved anger may have a negative impact on health. According to the American Psychological Association, anger has links with inflammation in older adults. This could lead to chronic diseases.

Research from 2015 suggests that the overall lifetime prevalence of intense, inappropriate, or poorly controlled anger in the general population in the United States is 7.8%. Anger seems to affect more men than women, and it also seems more prevalent among younger adults.

This article looks at the potential causes of anger, how to self-manage it, possible treatments and therapies, and when to see a doctor.

Share on Pinterest Problems relating to a specific person may trigger feelings of anger.

People can become angry for many reasons, and everyone experiences anger differently.

Events or circumstances that cause an angry outburst in one person may not affect another person at all.

Someone might experience anger if they feel:

  • attacked or threatened
  • deceived
  • frustrated or powerless
  • invalidated or unfairly treated
  • disrespected

Circumstances that may trigger feelings that lead to anger include:

  • problems that a specific person, such as a coworker, partner, friend, or family member, has caused
  • frustrating events, such as being stuck in a traffic jam or having a flight canceled
  • personal problems that cause extreme worry or ruminating
  • memories of traumatic or infuriating events
  • physical or psychological pain
  • environmental conditions, such as uncomfortable temperatures
  • feeling that goals are unachievable
  • personal offense due to unfair treatment, insults, rejections, and criticism

Anger can also play a significant role in grief. Many people feel angry when they are dealing with losing a partner, close friend, or family member.

The signs and symptoms of anger can vary from person to person. Anger affects the mind and body in a variety of ways.

Effects that anger may have on the body include:

  • increased heart rate
  • feeling hot
  • sweating
  • tightness in the chest
  • stomach churning
  • clenching jaws or grinding teeth
  • tense muscles
  • shaking or trembling
  • leg weakness
  • feeling faint

Effects that anger may have on the mind include feeling:

  • anxious, nervous, or unable to relax
  • easily irritated
  • guilty
  • sad or depressed
  • resentful
  • humiliated
  • like striking out physically or verbally

Other behaviors and feelings associated with anger include:

  • pacing
  • becoming sarcastic
  • losing sense of humor
  • shouting
  • yelling, screaming, or crying
  • acting in an abusive manner
  • craving substances such as alcohol or tobacco

Physical, emotional, and behavioral cues can help a person recognize when they are experiencing the intermediate stages between low and extreme anger levels.

It is important to note that anger and aggression are different things. Anger is an emotion, whereas aggression is related to how a person behaves.

Not everyone with anger behaves aggressively, and not everyone who acts aggressively is angry.

Anger itself is not classified as a mental disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM–5). For this reason, there are no diagnostic criteria for anger issues.

However, anger is associated with many mental health conditions, including:

  • antisocial personality disorder
  • attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • conduct disorder
  • intermittent explosive disorder
  • oppositional defiant disorder

Feeling angry is not always a sign of a mental health condition, but speaking to a doctor can help a person determine the underlying cause.

Everyone has a reaction to anger, but some techniques can help ensure the anger does not get out of control.

Strategies for managing anger include:

  • Recognizing the warning signs. Being aware of the changes in the body, emotions, and behaviors that result from anger can help someone decide how they want to react to a situation before they act.
  • Pausing before reacting. Walking away from the situation can buy the person some time to think and take back control.
  • Counting to 10. Taking a few seconds to count slowly to 10 can reduce the intensity of the anger.
  • Releasing tension in the body. To release tension, unclench the jaw, drop the shoulders, and uncross the arms and legs. Roll the shoulders back and stretch the neck to either side if holding tension here.
  • Listening. It can be easy to jump to conclusions when angry. If having a heated discussion, take some time to stop and listen before replying.
  • Exercising. Doing cardiovascular exercises such as running, cycling, or swimming can help release the energy that might otherwise become aggression.
  • Finding a distraction. Listening to music, dancing, going for a walk, writing in a journal, or just taking a shower can all help prevent anger from escalating.
  • Changing negative thought patterns. In the heat of the moment, the situation can seem much worse than it really is. A method called cognitive restructuring can help people challenge and replace angry thoughts.
  • Using relaxation techniques. Using relaxation strategies, such as deep breathing and progressive muscle relaxation, may help alleviate feelings of anger.

If a person’s anger is affecting their relationships, work, and other areas of their life, they may wish to seek advice from a doctor.

Indicators that anger has become a problem include:

  • regularly expressing anger through disruptive or destructive behavior
  • feeling as though anger is having an impact on physical or mental health
  • experiencing anger more often than other emotions

Some of the disruptive ways a person might express anger include:

  • Aggression and violence: This can include shouting, swearing, throwing things, and being verbally abusive, threatening, or physically violent.
  • Internal aggression: This can include self-harming, self-hatred, not eating, and isolating oneself.
  • Passive aggression: This can include ignoring people, refusing to do tasks, and being sarcastic but not explicitly saying anything angry or aggressive.

In these cases, it is important to seek support and treatment. Expressing anger through aggression and violence can harm friendships, family relationships, and relationships with coworkers, and it may have serious consequences.


How Anger Fires Up the Heart

Emotions such as anger and hostility ramp up your "fight or flight” response. When that happens, stress hormones, including adrenaline and cortisol, speed up your heart rate and breathing.

You get a burst of energy. Your blood vessels tighten. Your blood pressure soars.

Continued

You’re ready to run for your life or fight an enemy. If this happens often, it causes wear and tear on your artery walls.

In one report, researchers found that healthy people who are often angry or hostile are 19% more likely than calmer people to get heart disease. Among people with heart disease, those who usually feel angry or hostile fared worse than others.

So if anger has you in its crosshairs, it’s time to shift the way you react to it.


How to Switch Off an Angry Person

Any time I see people having angry altercations, I perk up my ears and observe intently. I watch their displays, not in a sadistic or feeling superior kind of way, but fascinated with how it unfolds: &ldquoWill it work for them? Are they going to get what they want with this approach&rdquo?

I have practically never seen it work, not during my observations in therapy or in personal life.

Even on rare occasions where it seems to work in the moment, yielding some win-loss resolution, it never works sustainably. Peace can never be found on a shaky and fake foundation of emotional tyranny. As humorist Kin Hubbard said, &ldquonobody ever forgets where he buried a hatchet.&rdquo

Here are some strategies for dealing with difficult people, organized around the main psychological premises driving their anger: fear and need for control.

Disengage and don&rsquot take it personally.

People are energy-conserving creatures. Just as most animals attack out of self-defense, hunger or other biological needs, human anger also is goal-driven. Most people, even most violent individuals, don&rsquot walk around the majority of the day attacking and abusing others. They lash out in spurts.

Behind their violent shield, a threatening individual is feeling threatened &mdash maybe not by you, but by something or someone. Their anger is related to you only in a way in which some action or expressed feeling of yours has triggered some discomforting emotion within them.

Threatening individuals commonly are overwhelmed and scared. Big bullies have deeply hurt and vulnerable cores. They are expending their toxic energy to produce their angry display as a distorted way to pursue some goal related to their personal sense of safety and significance. Even though the content may be channeled at you, the driving force behind it is related to their personality, upbringing, and prior experiences. Most of their accusations are based on subjective opinions and are very loosely, or not at all, related to you personally.

Avoid ego battles and rides to the past.

When it comes to aggression, an unfortunate point of difference between humans and less evolved mammals is the ego. Some people are willing to put their life on the line and injure another person physically or emotionally to protect their ego and restore their injured self-esteem. Inflated egos are most vulnerable to the slightest pokes and scratches, which is a common infliction of defensive and confrontational people.

Remember that ego injuries are always the deeds of the past. This is why the great focus of most angry people, when they are arguing, will be buried in the past. Therefore, at all costs, avoid accompanying them on their voyage there. Drain them by letting them give a monologue about their expired accusations. Avoid discussing with them about who did what, when and why, and how it made them feel, but repeatedly ask how they propose solving this problem now.

Remember also that most angry people have a victim mentality. They perpetually feel the world owes them something and other people must fulfill their preferences or needs. What angry people say is almost never factual but emotional in content, related to their fears, frustrations, and bruised ego. Attempting to talk with them almost always fails, as raging people are narrowly focused, entitled, and prone to listening only to themselves.

Choose calm and sanity.

An angry person is looking for a fight. Through their escalation and unfair accusations, they are asking you to engage. As Eric Hoffer said, &ldquorudeness is the weak man&rsquos imitation of strength.&rdquo

So, what is needed in the presence of a hot-headed person? A cool-headed person. The constructive response is not to indulge them in any action. When they shout, you keep silent or speak softly. When they come close, you increase the distance. When they say a lot, you say nothing or very little. Some people decide to respond, thinking that ignoring a provocation makes them lose and a bully to win. This is contrary to what actually happens. You win by disengaging. You become untouchable and gain control by increasing emotional and physical space.

Imagine this situation: You are on a road and the driver in front of you drives dangerously and erratically, swaying wildly sideways, speeding up and pressing the brakes, honking randomly. Should you catch up, open up your window and attempt a discussion on proper driving? Of course not. You shift lanes and drive away, quietly demonstrating your intelligence and preference for safety. De-escalate the angry person in a similar manner, by exiting the scene emotionally or physically, not participating in their drama.

Remember also that basic defenses of angry, self-justifying people are projection and denial. You tell them that they are scaring you with their shouting, they say you are the one yelling. You tell them their words are hurtful, they tell you that you told them things ten times worse, plus you are the one who made them angry to begin with. So, what are the ways to negotiate with reality distorters? The short answer is &ldquothere are none,&rdquo and the longer answer is, &ldquoThere are none, don&rsquot even try.&rdquo

Give out an imaginary cupcake.

Cupcakes are sweet , peaceful, calming and smile-inducing. Raging people often are in dire need of an imaginary cupcake. A big part of their anger is driven by their belief or feeling that they never get any or someone stole or damaged their cupcakes. So, generously give them one or even a couple, even when they seem to be undeserving of any sweetness.

Despite the obnoxious behavior, loud shouting, screeching voices, clenching fists, pointing fingers, red faces and all, most angry people have a sad message. Most likely they are trying to tell you that they are feeling hurt, ignored, disrespected, unappreciated and unloved.

Listening and responding to these needs calmly and emphatically can serve as the key to getting more cooperation from emotionally agitated people. Just say &ldquoI think I understand what is going on here, but feel free to correct me, my friend&rdquo and so on. Then offer some reflective listening, validating their concerns to an extent. Tell them something nice and peaceful. Agree with them in theory. Do not assign any blame or argue. Establish a basic premise for peace by appealing in some way to the dormant, healthy side of their personality by extending to them some sense of grace, validation, and acceptance.


Demographics

As of 2002, it has not been possible to determine the number of people with PPD with any accuracy. This lack of data might be expected for a disorder that is characterized by extreme suspiciousness. Such patients in many cases avoid voluntary contact with such people as mental health workers who have a certain amount of power over them. There are, nonetheless, some estimates of the prevalence of PPD. According to the DSM-IV-TR , between 0.5% and 2.5% of the general population of the United States may have PPD, while 2%&ndash10% of outpatients receiving psychiatric care may be affected. A significant percentage of institutionalized psychiatric patients, between 10% and 30%, might have symptoms that qualify for a diagnosis of PPD. Finally, the disorder appears to be more common in men than in women.

There are indications in the scientific literature that relatives of patients with chronic schizophrenia may have a greater chance of developing PPD than people in the general population. Also, the incidence of the disorder may be higher among relatives of patients suffering from another psychotic disorder known as delusional disorder of the persecutory type.


What Is Anger? Definition & Psychology Behind This Emotion

Anger is defined as "a strong feeling of annoyance, displeasure, or hostility." It's important to note that anger is a normal, universal human emotion. There are a series of instances and events in life which can cause someone to become angry. Typically, anger arises when someone feels threatened, disturbed, or otherwise interrupted from a peaceful emotional state. Anger can also be combined with other emotions, such as jealousy, sadness, or hopelessness.

There are many misconceptions surrounding anger. One of the most common misconceptions is that anger is a bad emotion. Anger isn't a bad emotion however, when someone isn't able to manage their anger in an appropriate way, bad things can happen. To date, there are countless stories of people losing relationships, careers and even their lives because of the way they handled their anger.

Psychology Of Anger

Understanding the psychology of anger will provide a lot of insight into this emotion and what it's truly all about. First and foremost, the American Psychology Association states that anger is generated towards a person or thing which one perceives as having wronged them in one way or another. Anger is not always negative, though it can sometimes serve as inspiration for people to take action or overcome certain fears.

Of course, there are some negatives associated with anger, particularly if this emotion is ongoing or recurring for very long periods. Anger can lead to damaged relationships, lower quality of life, and even health issues, such as higher blood pressure and other tolls on a person's mental and physical health. The negative aftereffects which are associated with repeated and ongoing anger are reasons why controlling anger is so important.

Controlling Anger

Anger may be an inevitable emotion which humans feel from time to time, but this doesn't mean that we are powerless to control it. By having a grasp on anger, we can ensure that this emotion doesn't fester and become strong enough to control us. Believe it or not, one of the first steps towards controlling anger is acknowledging its existence. Many people have issues with admitting that they are angry this is especially problematic because no issue can be fixed or dealt with until it's at least addressed.

You never want to be in a position where you find yourself unable to control feelings of anger. Being in this place means that anger has controlled you, which is only a recipe for disaster. When someone is unable to control their anger, they tend to lash out and otherwise do things which they will regret later. Anger is not an inherently bad emotion, but when anger controls you instead of you controlling it, this is when danger arrives.

Thankfully, there are a multitude of ways in which you can control your anger. First comes acknowledging the fact that you are angry. This may sound absurdly basic, but there is a stunning amount of people who refuse even to admit how they're feeling. This is especially problematic because no issue can be resolved unless it's first acknowledged. No matter how annoyed, agitated or angry you're feeling, it's important to remember to acknowledge the way you feel.

Once you've acknowledged feelings of anger, you can then begin to assess them. Why are you angry? What's bothering you? Is your anger a result of feeling threatened or scared? In most scenarios, it won't be that difficult to know why you are angry. When people experience feelings of anger, there is almost always a person, event, decision or another trigger which sets them off.

There are so many other strategies which can be used to manage anger&mdashdeep breathing, removing yourself from the situation, and even making certain lifestyle changes, if necessary. Of course, certain solutions are better than others, but there are deeper ways of managing and controlling your anger. Ultimately, these deeper methods each involve getting to the root of your anger, and in many cases, this is easier said than done.

The Root Of Anger

Understanding the root of your anger makes all the difference. Anger can be a very complex emotion and sometimes, it's an aftereffect of previous issues which haven't been resolved. There are many situations when people resort to anger to conceal emotions which may make them feel more vulnerable, such as sadness, jealousy or disappointment. In other scenarios, ongoing anger may serve as a manifestation of an underlying problem from a long time ago or even childhood.

At the end of the day, having a firm grasp on the root of your anger makes all the difference. Sometimes, anger really can be simply the result of a person or situation, but if you are constantly feeling angry, then this is may be indicative of a larger issue. This larger issue could be a poor relationship, a lifestyle choice, a toxic environment, etc. Regardless of what it may be, you're going to need to get to the bottom of it if you are serious about bettering yourself and freeing yourself from habitual anger.

Patterns exist throughout all facets of life. They manifest in relationships, career choices, and so much more. Patterns are also dominant themes in emotional states and feelings. When dealing with anger, it's important to be cognizant of patterns and the roles which they play in your feelings. One of the most revealing things about patterns is that they provide insight into who you are, your choices, and whether certain changes are in order.

If you find that you are constantly feeling angry around certain people or in certain environments, then this is a very negative pattern which requires a change. Remember, people and environments who are good for you will not constantly cause you to feel angry or otherwise unhappy. Sometimes, we must make tough decisions now which allows us to grow and evolve in the long run.

Pitfalls Of Ongoing Anger

The definition and psychology of anger have been explored and well-documented. Even such, there are still many people who fail to realize the pitfalls which are associated with ongoing states of anger and discontentment. Anger can ruin opportunities, destroy families, and prevent people from having experiences which would be good for them and help them grow.

Ongoing anger is not a positive state of being. As the old saying goes, like attracts like. If you are constantly in a state of anger, you will attract additional things to be angry about. The way you feel on a daily, regular basis matters, and it sets the tone for so many things in your life. It determines how you go about life, how others perceive you, the manner in which you interact with people, and so much more. The ultimate pitfall of ongoing anger is robbing yourself of an amazing quality of life which could be available to you.

If You Struggle With Managing Anger

Being cognizant of patterns, taking note of triggers, and noticing patterns is all well and good. However, there are certain situations where people do their best and yet still struggle to manage their anger. Generally, a person who has trouble with their anger may lash out at others or otherwise behave in self-destructive ways when things aren't working out in the ways which they would like.

The pitfalls of going down this road have already been established which is why anger management therapy can be so helpful. Anger management therapy allows you to work with a professional, get to the bottom of your anger, and deal with this emotion in positive and constructive ways. The goal of anger management is not to eradicate anger as an emotion or to never feel angry. There will always be situations which cause anger, but how you handle them will determine so much.

Sometimes there is shame or stigma attached to the idea of taking anger management courses. Some people feel embarrassed regarding their struggle with controlling themselves when they are angry. Others feel as though they should be able to do it on their own without the guidance of a professional. In different scenarios, the ego is a factor. No matter what it is, the reality is that anger management therapy can prove to be very helpful. Counselors and therapists are in the business of assisting people and getting them on track to living their best lives, not judging them.

Managing Anger With BetterHelp

An increasingly large number of studies suggest that online therapy can help those experiencing complicated feelings related to anger. In a study published in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, a peer-reviewed medical journal, researchers looked at the effects of online therapy for those experiencing problematic anger. They found that participants showed significantly decreased feelings of anger after only a brief treatment. This result is consistent with the findings from numerous recent studies showing that online therapy can help manage symptoms of varied mental health issues. It is widely considered a more accessible form of treatment, as it circumvents many common barriers, including high costs, time and geographical constraints, and perceived stigma.

As outlined above, if you&rsquore experiencing high levels of anger, online counseling can help you work through its sources and triggers. With BetterHelp, you&rsquoll be able to participate in online therapy from the comfort of your home (or wherever you have an internet connection). So, you can attend sessions without the potential stress of dealing with traffic, sitting in a crowded waiting room, or skipping lunch. The qualified mental health professionals at BetterHelp can give you anger management techniques that work. Read below for reviews of counselors, from those who have experienced similar issues.

Counselor Reviews

&ldquoI'm happy I had counseling with Glenn. I used to struggle with anger and trust issues towards my husband when I first talked to Glenn. He listened to me attentively and asked questions delicately and politely. I felt that he cared about my case and really wanted to help me. And he did help me solve my relationship problems. Glenn taught me to forgive, manage conflicts, and express and receive love. Now I enjoy my close and intimate relationship with my loved one, and there's no place for anger and hate in me anymore. Finally I feel understood, supported, happy and calm. And I'm so thankful to Glenn for guiding me there.&rdquo

&ldquoRegina helped me pinpoint where my anger issue stemmed from in the very first session, and has been helping me become more self aware of my warning triggers. Very insightful and helpful!&rdquo

If you feel as though you are going through a tough time in life, then therapy may prove to be helpful. Whether you're struggling with anger or dealing with another matter entirely, it's important for you to understand that you are not alone. At the end of the day, we all go through tough times, but dealing with them and continuing to push forward is what ultimately matters.


Birthmarks

A 2012 study found children with rare birthmarks called Congenital Melanocytic Naevi were more likely to have the MC1R mutation that causes red hair than children without the birthmarks.

Congenital Melanocytic Naevi are brown or black birthmarks that can cover up to 80 percent of the body. About 1 in 20,000 children have large or multiple CMN.

Study researcher Dr. Veronica Kinsler, of Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, said: "If you have red hair in your family, these findings should not worry you, as changes in the red hair gene are common, but large CMN are very rare. So the changes do not cause the CMN to happen, but just increase the risk."


Warning Signs of an Anger Issue

How can you spot an anger problem?

“When it occurs too frequently, when the intensity is too strong, or when it endures too long,” says Howard Kassinove, PhD, director of Hofstra University's Institute for the Study and Treatment of Anger and Aggression. He also co-wrote “Anger Management for Everyone: Seven Proven Ways to Control Anger and Live a Happier Life.”

Kassinove sees degrees of anger: annoyance, anger, and rage. Occasionally feeling annoyed or even angry is nothing to worry about.

“Most people report that they get angry once or twice a week,” Kassinove says, “but people who rate high for the anger trait become angry about once a day. Holding on to anger for too long is another sign of trouble. We see patients who are still angry at people who died years ago.”

Looking closely at yourself can help. “People may ask themselves, 'Am I alone? Have I lost jobs, lost friends, lost family because of my anger?'” Abrams says.

Continued

In most cases, though, people are usually blind to their own issues, he says. Denial is common, too. Usually, it’s someone else who persuades them to seek help.

“Many people will say things like: 'There is nothing wrong with me. Somebody else or something else is causing me to be angry.'”

Kassinove agrees. “The first step is understanding that anger is caused by how you interpret an event. No one can force you to be angry," he says. "Once you recognize that, you are in charge of your own anger.”


7 Ways Anger Is Ruining Your Health

Constantly losing your cool can hurt more than your relationships.

Sometimes anger can be good for you, if it's addressed quickly and expressed in a healthy way. In fact, anger may help some people think more rationally. However, unhealthy episodes of anger — when you hold it in for long periods of time, turn it inward, or explode in rage — can wreak havoc on your body. If you're prone to losing your temper, here are seven important reasons to stay calm.

1. An angry outburst puts your heart at great risk. Most physically damaging is anger's effect on your cardiac health. “In the two hours after an angry outburst, the chance of having a heart attack doubles,” says Chris Aiken, MD, an instructor in clinical psychiatry at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine and director of the Mood Treatment Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

“Repressed anger — where you express it indirectly or go to great lengths to control it, is associated with heart disease,” says Dr. Aiken. In fact, one study found that people with anger proneness as a personality trait were at twice the risk of coronary disease than their less angry peers.

To protect your ticker, identify and address your feelings before you lose control. “Constructive anger — the kind where you speak up directly to the person you are angry with and deal with the frustration in a problem-solving manner — is not associated with heart disease,” and is actually a very normal, healthy emotion, says Aiken.

2. Anger ups your stroke risk. If you’re prone to lashing out, beware. One study found there was a three times higher risk of having a stroke from a blood clot to the brain or bleeding within the brain during the two hours after an angry outburst. For people with an aneurysm in one of the brain’s arteries, there was a six times higher risk of rupturing this aneurysm following an angry outburst.

Some good news: You can learn to control those angry explosions. “To move into positive coping, you need to first identify what your triggers, and then figure out how to change your response,” says Mary Fristad, PhD, a professor of psychiatry and psychology at the Ohio State University. Instead of losing your temper, “Do some deep breathing. Use assertive communication skills. You might even need to change your environment by getting up and walking away,” says Dr. Fristad.

3. It weakens your immune system. If you're mad all the time, you just might find yourself feeling sick more often. In one study, Harvard University scientists found that in healthy people, simply recalling an angry experience from their past caused a six-hour dip in levels of the antibody immunoglobulin A, the cells’ first line of defense against infection.

If you're someone who's habitually angry, protect your immune system by turning to a few effective coping strategies. “Assertive communication, effective problem solving, using humor, or restructuring your thoughts to get away from that black-and-white, all-or-nothing thinking — those are all good ways to cope,” says Fristad. “But you've got to start by calming down.”

4. Anger problems can make your anxiety worse. If you’re a worrier, it’s important to note that anxiety and anger can go hand-in-hand. In a 2012 study published in the journal Cognitive Behavior Therapy, researchers found that anger can exacerbate symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), a condition characterized by an excessive and uncontrollable worry that interferes with a person’s daily life. Not only were higher levels of anger found in people with GAD, but hostility — along with internalized, unexpressed anger in particular — contributed greatly to the severity of GAD symptoms.

5. Anger is also linked to depression. Numerous studies have linked depression with aggression and angry outbursts, especially in men. “In depression, passive anger — where you ruminate about it but never take action — is common,” says Aiken. His No. 1 piece of advice for someone struggling with depression mixed with anger is to get busy and stop thinking so much.

“Any activity which fully absorbs you is a good cure for anger, such as golf, needlepoint, biking,” he says. “These tend to fill our minds completely and pull our focus toward the present moment, and there's just no room left for anger to stir when you've got that going.”

6. Hostility can hurt your lungs. Not a smoker? You still could be hurting your lungs if you're a perpetually angry, hostile person. A group of Harvard University scientists studied 670 men over eight years using a hostility scale scoring method to measure anger levels and assessed any changes in the men's lung function. The men with the highest hostility ratings had significantly worse lung capacity, which increased their risk of respiratory problems. The researchers theorized that an uptick in stress hormones, which are associated with feelings of anger, creates inflammation in the airways.

7. Anger can shorten your life. Is it really true that happy people live longer? “Stress is very tightly linked to general health. If you're stressed and angry, you'll shorten your lifespan,” says Fristad. A University of Michigan study done over a 17-year period found that couples who hold in their anger have a shorter life span than those who readily say when they're mad.

If you're not someone who's comfortable showing negative emotions, then work with a therapist or practice on your own to be more expressive. “Learning to express anger in an appropriate way is actually a healthy use of anger,” says Fristad. “If someone infringes on your rights, you need to tell them. Directly tell people what you're mad about, and what you need,” she says.