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Does everyone have some degree of Aspergers?

Does everyone have some degree of Aspergers?


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I have taken some tests for Asperger's which gives a rating point, and the higher you score its more likely that you have asperger. I was just wondering if this means that there are degrees of asperger, that everyone is asperger to some degree, or is this rating just a property of the test, and people either have asperger syndrome or not?


Whatever test you took, it does not test Asperger. It tests for symptoms that are typical in someone with Asperger.

For example one Asperger test asks you to rate the following statement (translated from German) on a skale from 1 = "totally disagree" to 4 = totally agree":

  1. I prefer to spend my leisure time with other people rather than alone.

Now of course people with Asperger often tend to stay by themselves and undertake things alone rather than with friends, but many non-Asperger people might feel that they sometimes enjoy time alone also, for example if they are naturally shy and find being with others enjoyable but exhausting, or if they have a job dealing with people and they like to have some free time by themselves to relax from the constant interaction.

Just this weekend I read an interview with one of the most influential German movie directors, Doris Dörrie, who said how she likes to go on holidays by herself, especially to foreign countries where she cannot interact with anyone because she does not speak the language, and she goes on to tell how she went to Japan and enjoyed her aloneness tremendously and spent whole days basking in being outside society and looking on. Totally Asperger, if you think about it. But her job is to intensely interact with people, and she simply needs time off from that.

It's totally unremarkable that many people show some of the behaviors or emotions that people with Asperger (or other psychological disorders) show. It does not mean that they have Asperger to some degree. Rather, if someone rates very high in that test, that is merely an indication that they very likely have Asperger. No psychological diagnosis relies purely on a single self-report measure, but on a complex series of observation, interviews, and a battery of tests.


Also see the answer by Eoin for a different perspective on the question.


Two additional points to the previous answer fromwhat.

  • With the release of the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), Asperger's is no longer classified as a condition in its own right, but as Autism coupled with high intelligence and intact language skills.

  • Almost all accounts of Autism hold that it exists as a spectrum, or a continuum: some people are very typical of the condition, some people are very strongly the opposite, and most people are somewhere in between.

Autism (and Asperger's) is characterized by a 'triad of impairments' to social interaction,communication (less so for Asperger's), and flexible imaginative functions (i.e. repeated/stereotyped behaviours and interests). Obviously, these are traits that vary across the general population as well (I, like many scientists, can be very focused and one-track in my interests).

I recently also came across a paper by Happé and Ronald (2008) (link) arguing that, genetically speaking, these traits vary independently of each other in the general population. It's only when someone has high levels of all three that they are diagnosed as having Autism.

Finally, for an even more broad theory of Autistic traits in the general population, take a look at Simon Baron-Cohen's extreme male brain theory of autism, which states that people differ in the fundamental trait of being either 'empathizing' or 'systematizing', with men tending to be more 'systematizing'. Autism, then, is just a case of being more like a male brain then usual, or super-systematizing.

I hope this is some help!


No. Everyone is not a little bit autistic. Everyone may not be "typically developing" in some or some aspect; but autism is not universal.

Apparently Same symptoms or same behaviour may have complete different reasons.

Aspergers is predominately a communication problem and problem with social guesswork. Usually a vast number of other complaints co-occur which are invisible from outside. It not necessarily includes introversion, rather the introversion is sometimes a byproduct of failed communication with peer group.

Some typically developing people may be shy or introverted. Who do not like to make friends. But they have good social skills.

Some people may develop narcissistic personality disorder. Which is a problem about ego. They may have manipulative nature. They tend to have good understanding of social cues.

In some cases these condition may be co-occuring. However everyone is not autistic, and there isn't a thing like being a "little bit" autistic. Being in even very mild end of ASD spectrum is usually a very stressful condition, however the invisibility of the disability often blends it so much indistinguishably with typically developing population.

Another situation of similar superficial appearance, Also Say for a restless uncontrollable behaviour may look common with ADHD and some ASD as well as typically developing. But the inherent reason may be very different. Such as for ADHD it may be a shifting attention and energetic impulse, whereas in ASD it may be the anxiety developed from lack of predictability of a real life process going on. A typically developing person can do the same due to joy or anger or boredom but they have better response inhibition. Even bipolar patients may have indistinguishable symptom, but that is due to an unusual state of mood and feeling, even without triggered by another reason.

Psychology is very tricky. Not only behaviours but the reasons behind behaviour to be considered.


5 Strengths Necessary for Success as a School Psychologist

A school psychologist works in the educational system and offers assistance to children who suffer social, emotional, and academic problems. Since each student is different, an individual approach is necessary to promote a healthy environment for learning. A person following this career path must possess five key strengths for success.

1. Knows How to Deal with Emotions

A student may consult with a school psychologist for a number of reasons. Besides academic problems, this professional helps a child deal with emotional issues. Oftentimes, a student’s negative classroom behavior is a manifestation of a troubled home life. A child does not have to suffer abuse to become withdrawn or violent. A divorce, death in the family, or other issue may cause a student to display a wide range of emotions. A child may be angry, sad, or display flashes of rage at school. It is up to the psychologist to uncover the root of the problem and provide other outlets for the child to manage his or her feelings.

2. Has an Approachable Personality

A child is often afraid to confide in a strange adult. A school psychologist must present an approachable personality that welcomes everyone. If a child does not feel safe, he or he will not openly discuss private issues. The best way to seem inviting to a child is to share personal information. Stories help a child relate to an adult and build trust. It may get a student comfortable enough to tell stories as well. A school psychologist listens well and reads between the lines to assess emotions. When a child realizes it is safe to trust the psychologist, he or she will feel free to visit whenever there is a problem.

3. Knows How to Train Parents and Faculty

School psychologists spend a majority of time dealing with students. They are also responsible for training teachers and parents how to get through times of crisis and how to deal with issues like substance abuse. These professionals act as a school’s cornerstone for intervention.

For example, today’s headlines are filled with stories of school shootings. Psychologists meet with students to discuss these types of situations and help them deal with the emotional aftermath.

School psychologists try to educate parents and faculty about substance abuse issues as well. They explain how to recognize signs of problems and how to get children the help they need.

4. Is Creative

A school psychologist is responsible for developing programs that help students overcome learning barriers. After analyzing certain test results, a psychologist must work with teachers to create activities that stimulate learning. When a child is interested in school, he or she is likely to participate and retain as much information as possible. It is also a psychologist’s job to evaluate the effectiveness of academic programs already in existence and to make changes when necessary.

If a student with learning difficulties is detected, a psychologist must design a program to encourage academic success. Since each child is different, it takes creativity to implement a strategy that works well.

5. Appreciates and Encourages Diversity

Most schools have students of different races and religions. Since this can be a basis for strife, a school psychologist must nip trouble in the bud and establish a place where everyone is viewed as equal. This professional must embrace diversity and help foster tolerance among the classrooms. Learning about various cultures helps students appreciate their differences and come together as a cohesive unit. This keeps the school safe and maintains a place that is conducive to learning.

School psychology is a good career choice for a person who wants to work in an educational setting to help parents and teachers create the best environment for learning. It is a promising field for an individual looking to help children reach their full potentials.


Do you ever self analyze your own psychology?

It is one of the reasons talk therapy never worked for me. When I had my neuropsych eval the doctor commented on my high level of self-awareness and introspection. I dislike it sometimes because it means I am aware enough to realize when I struggle with things but still cant help it.

For example, I have a habit of waiting at crosswalks for the walk sign. No matter what. For context I live in Boston. I am aware I am doing it when I do it but still can't help do it.

My level of self awareness is so high that its depressing because when I look around, seems like nobody else does the same or realizes the same things either for themselves of how they come across to others. I actually had an in depth convo about it with my dad because it is something im interested in paying attention to and I like to try and run the idea across some people to get then to look within sometimes. Never works.

Doctor: “have you tried fixing it? You’re aware it exists so. fix it.”

Me: “yeah I can’t do that. I know it exists, but I can’t fix it’s existence.”

As an aside, I love the "for context, I live in Boston" since we'll just walk into the road anywhere here.

Every. Damn. Therapist. Every time.

Why can't you do anything to help it - have you tried?

i have been in the same boat! However, what I have found is that this just means we are not the unified coherent self that we would like ourselves to be. There are at least three parts of self at work- a part that is cognizant of social cues and of how to act and that is actively trying to get you to follow them. There is another part that is not listening to reason very well. I imagine this part is trying to keep you safe. There is a third part monitoring this exchange.

I can relate. My last therapist says I'm meta-cognizant, introspective, self-aware and emotionally intelligent. She would constantly ask me why I'm in therapy or what I want to achieve. It bothered me, I've been told on Reddit how you can go into therapy for anything. I wanted to work on recognizing my emotions before they can "burn" me. She claimed I'm already doing that, etc. Not sure if a new therapist would help. I'm sure a therapist wouldn't say therapy is "impossible" on people like us. I wonder what they meant.


10 Symptoms of High-Functioning Autism

Diagnosis rates for autism continue to rise, especially as parents and professionals become more familiar with the symptoms of high-functioning autism. Many patients are getting the assistance they need to live full, productive lives because their unusual behaviors are no longer seen as simple social awkwardness or eccentricity. As more caring medical and mental health professionals learn to recognize the most common symptoms of autism, the number of interventions available to people with autism will rise.

Emotional Sensitivity

Although often overlooked, sensitivity to emotions is a common issue for people on the high end of the autism spectrum. These individuals can function in day-to-day life but struggle to control their emotions the same way that neurotypical, or non-autistic people, are able to do. For example, a frustrating morning experience like running out of milk or being cut off while driving can cause irritability and difficulty concentrating for the rest of the day. People with autism may also have unusually intense emotional reactions compared to the rest of the population.

Fixation on Particular Subjects or Ideas

Continually discussing the same topics in conversation, obsessively playing the same song repeatedly, or reading every article written about a certain topic are some ways that autistic fixations can manifest. These interests can be negative if they take over the individual’s life or interfere with their relationships with others. Of course, these obsessive tendencies can also be helpful Dan Aykroyd, writer and star in the hit film Ghostbusters, was inspired by his focus on ghosts and the paranormal. Many other high-functioning autistic individuals have used their focus on mathematics, biology, or writing to inspire successful careers.

Linguistic Oddities

Children on the low-functioning end of the autism spectrum usually struggle with learning to speak, building vocabulary and holding conversations with others. Their counterparts on the higher end of the spectrum may start talking much earlier than normal and often display an impressive vocabulary. They may find conversations with others boring or difficult to follow and may avoid speaking with their peers. Many people with mild autism may simply seem eccentric during conversations as their diverse vocabularies, frequent interruptions or focus on particular topics seem like oddities rather than neurological symptoms.

Social Difficulties

Parents and teachers may notice that young autistics have problems interacting with their peers. These symptoms of high-functioning autism in children and teenagers can include a limited social circle, problems sharing toys or materials, and difficulty completing group work. Sometimes youth are considered shy, quirky or socially awkward when they are truly dealing with autism and in need of counseling services to help them learn social rules, as the problems with interacting with others usually stem from a lack of understanding appropriate behavior with peers. Early intervention from mental health professionals can help autistic youth learn the best ways to interact with their classmates and potential friends.

Problems Processing Physical Sensations

Many individuals with autism have sensory difficulties. They may find specific noises, tastes, smells, or feelings intolerable. Noisy public places can lead to emotional distress, as can uncomfortable clothing or unwanted touches. These issues can be disruptive and stressful, but according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, autism symptoms can improve over time as children with mild autism learn to regulate their own behavior through work with professionals.

Devotion to Routines

People with high-functioning autism are typically devoted to routines. They may stick with routines developed for them by others, such as reading for exactly 15 minutes before going to bed or brushing their teeth exactly five minutes after eating a meal. Any sort of deviation from the routine, such as a parent needing to help a sick sibling at bedtime instead of reading to the affected individual could cause the person to become frustrated. The person with high-functioning autism may devote an exorbitant amount of time to performing their routines to the detriment of self-care, sleep, exercise, homework or learning.

Development of Repetitive or Restrictive Habits

Repetitive habits are another sign of high-functioning autism. Those habits could interfere with the person’s ability to do what they need to do or what others want them to do. One type of repetitive habit might be related to movement. The individual might have to tie and untie their shoes multiple times before they are satisfied and are able to start walking or leave the house. Some people develop restrictive habits that interfere with socially accepted living. For example, an individual might refuse to wear any other kind of shirt than a tee shirt. This could impact their health and well-being if they live in a place with cold weather.

Dislike of Change

A hallmark of high-functioning autism is a strong dislike of change. An individual might eat the same meal every day for breakfast, and they may eat it in the same quantity, on the same dish, and in the same place. Any disruption or change in the routine could cause an outburst in the individual. For example, if the usual brand of peanut butter has run out, and a different brand has been purchased instead, the person with high-functioning autism may have an outburst of anger or frustration. If someone has used their preferred dish, they may have a similar outpouring of volatility.

Focus on Self

People with high-functioning autism may have trouble developing deep social relationships with others. Part of this issue also includes an inordinate focus on self. A person with high-functioning autism may spend an excessive amount of time talking about themselves, not allowing another person to share a complete thought or response. This makes carrying on a conversation difficult. In the family or household setting, a person with high-functioning autism may only think of themselves when doing activities. For example, they might pour themselves a drink without asking if anyone else would also like a drink. They might take more than what others perceive as a fair share of a snack or treat, genuinely not thinking that others might also want some of the items.

Unusual Movement Patterns

A person with high-functioning autism may have unusual movement patterns. Toe walking is a common movement disorder. The person may walk on their toes or the ball and the toes of the feet without putting much bodyweight on the other parts of the foot. This can result in foot pain in the ball, hammertoe, or bunion from the excessive pressure. The shoes and socks may wear out in the forefoot area much faster than in the heel area. People who walk on their toes may experience more foot injuries, such as blisters, calluses, and corns on their footpads and toes. Toe walking is more common in young children and people with musculoskeletal, explains the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.

Not all individuals with autism exhibit physical tics or an inability to maintain social ties. People with high-functioning autism usually present symptoms not originally associated with autism, and helping professionals must continue to push for recognition of the range of behaviors associated with the autism spectrum. Familiarity with these ten symptoms of high-functioning autism helps providers, parents, teachers and others coordinate the early treatment of a person with this condition.


Reviews & endorsements

"The subject of this delightful book is the most important in child psychiatry and possibly in medicine, because at issue is the essence of our human nature. Buy Frith's book as a treat, read it, and send it to an editor as a reminder that brevity is not always beneficial it took Asperger sixty pages to make his point, and Kanner thirty-three." The Lancet

"Uta Frith not only provides the first-ever translation into English of Asperger's paper, but has brought together a variety of fascinating phenomenological and narrative accounts of the syndrome and its varied presentations. Autism and Asperger Syndrome is an invaluable book, not only for researchers, therapists and clinicians, but for parents and teachers, for everyone concerned with understanding autism, and seeing its clinical and its human dimension too." Oliver Sacks

". highly recommended to a variety of readers, including medical and behavioural scientists, parents, friends and even sufferers from Asperger's syndrome. It is clear, succinct and so far unique in its presentation of important findings relating to this impairment." Nature

"The strength of this book is in its rich description of the range of behaviors that characterize autistic spectrum disorders and in the review of the links between social deficits in these disorders and possible underlying cognitive mechanisms. a well written, thoughtful, and interesting text that is well worth reading." Joseph Piven, American Journal of Psychiatry

"I found the text informative and fascinating. Its specificity, clarity, and depth make Autism and Asperger Syndrome the best reference we have found about the syndrome." Whole Earth Review

"This book provides an in-depth analysis on Asperger's, autism and how the two are related." Columbia, MO, Missourian


The Five Types Of Asperger's

It still pisses me off that the DSM5 got rid of Asperger&rsquos. Not only is Asperger&rsquos it&rsquos own thing (repetitive behaviors & special interestsyou guys!) but there&rsquos differentlevels of it. There areso many genes that go into autism that it might even be split into several different disorders someday. Here&rsquos a totallyunscientific set of types based on aspies I&rsquove known:

Impulsive (aka Party Crasher)

These aspies are run by their ids. They&rsquore the most high-energy and the most likely to blurt out rude shit.Most prone to repetitive behaviors. Also more likely to showtheir feelings than other types. Prone to addictions from Internet browsing to heroin. They usually have more social awareness than they&rsquore given credit for. They can evenbe charismatic for short periods of time, which makes sense because they&rsquore generally the most social. But they&rsquore the hardest aspies to spend extended periods of time with. They used to let their inner monologue run wild when they were younger, driving people away. They may or may not have learned better. Most have developed some pride in their inadvertent &ldquotell it like it is&rdquo attitude, whichis appreciated by certain people. Misdiagnoses include ADHD, bipolar disorder, & borderline.

Methodical (aka Patrick Bateman)

These aspies study the social world long and hard. They&rsquore generally pretty touchy, having very specific ideas about what&rsquos good and what isn&rsquot. The most outwardly adept of the bunch, they can hold jobs and sustain friendships longer than other types. High IQs. High intensity. Repetitive behaviors. Wry conversationalists. Like to control their environment. Theirsperg finally showswhen you notice the studied aspect of their interactions. Plus their obsessive special interests, which they&rsquore among the most likely to have. May be misdiagnosed with OCD or a personality disorder. I think these aspies are mostly men.

Sluggish (aka Stealth)

The low-energy type. They have the most sensory problems, but those sensory sensitivities can also bring them plenty of joy. They might have a better sense of smell, taste, and touch than most people. They get overwhelmed the most easily and it takes them the longest to recharge after any possible exertion. They generally don&rsquot talk much.They have trouble articulating their thoughts to words. They have trouble with employment too. But to make up for all that they often have the most situational awareness of all types. They might even be street smart. That astuteness takes them ten times more energy than it takes everyone else, which is one reason they&rsquore so tired. They might be misdiagnosed with ADD, hearing problems, schizophrenia, or a less intelligent form of autism.

Studious (aka Wedgie)

The prototypical Asperger. These people are usually smart, well-read, and mild-mannered.They&rsquore the most noticeably intelligent of all types and they havethe least awareness. They get taken advantage of easily. But they&rsquore more adaptable than other types. Likely to work in tech. But they may also be found in teaching or helping professions. They have patience, discipline, and a drive towards mastery. Usually loyal to a fault. They were made fun of when they were younger, but now people like having them around.They make friends through either special interests or sheer wholesomeness. May have a good sense of humor. Common misdiagnoses include ADHD, OCD, and major depression.

Masked (aka Good Actress)

The least obvious aspies. They don&rsquot have blunt tells like repetitive behaviors or big mouths, at least not in front of other people. It surprises people when these aspies slip up. Generally the most empathetic type, they havedecently developedtheory of mind skills but might also be gullible at unfortunate times. Peopleget protective of them without knowing why. They&rsquore popular by aspie standards, because they&rsquove learned how to be good conversationalists and good listeners. Chances are they were eitherdiagnosed late or so early that they&rsquove gotten every kind of help possible. They might be misdiagnosed with ADHD, OCD, eating disorders, or major depression. I think these are mostly women.

I&rsquom an Impulsive and myboyfriend&rsquos a Sluggish. But I&rsquove dated all of them. Especially Methodicals. If you don&rsquot like yourself on here you might be able to change with time. It&rsquos like the Myers-Briggs for spergs.


Conclusion

This information on the three types of autism spectrum disorder can help you understand individuals with autism better. More and more information has come to light about autism in recent decades due to new research, shedding insight on the symptoms, unique characteristics, and treatment modalities of this disorder. While more research still needs to be done on treatments and interventions for those with autism, we know a vast amount more than we did in the recent past. Those with either type of autism spectrum disorder can live a full and happy life however, some need an early diagnosis as well as ABA interventions put in place to ensure success in the critical areas of need. If you suspect a child has a type of ASD, please pass your observations along to the teacher, parent, school nurse, clinician, etc. Intervening early is the key.


Traits Of People Who May Have Asperger Syndrome

Some people who are on the autism spectrum go through life without anyone noticing. They may seem a bit "strange," or have some odd interests. For the most part, however, they blend right on in with the rest of the society. But there are also the people who display more traits of Asperger Syndrome, and these people — your friend, your coworker, your SO, your neighbor — tend to stand out a bit more.

"Typically, the defining factor in someone who has Asperger's . is a lack of social skills," says Nicole Martinez, Psy.D., LCPC, in an email to Bustle. "They. are brilliant, but just 'aren't people persons.'" To everyone else, this might look like they have a case of the awkwards, or a total lack of desire (or inability) to make eye contact.

And this is where Asperger's often gets confused with autism. "Autism is a more debilitating disorder, with a far worse prognosis depending on severity of symptoms and intervention timing," Dr. Michele Barton tells me via email. "Asperger's is far less severe and has a much better prognosis. Individuals often go on to live acceptable mainstream lifestyles."

Due to these differences, the terminology has recently changed. "Asperger's is now grouped among other syndromes that fall on the same continuum termed Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)," Barton explains. "Individuals formerly diagnosed with Asperger's are now diagnosed as High Functioning ASD." Read on to learn more about these ASD traits, so you can better understand what it looks like.

1. They'll May Have Difficulty Reading Other People's Emotions

If someone is on the autism spectrum, one of their defining characteristics will be a decided lack of social skills. "They struggle in this area," Martinez says. "They have difficulty reading other people's emotions, facial expressions, and how they should respond in emotional situations." It can make social gatherings, or even the simplest of convos, feel kinda awkward.

2. Articulate People Are Often Their BFFs

Since reading emotions is sort of a no-go, younger people with ASD will often turn to people they can relate to verbally. As Barton says, "Social situations are hard to navigate as they are not very receptive to expressive and emotional cues. So, from a young age they enjoy the company of more verbally articulate adults or older children."

3. They May Have A Narrow Range Of Interests

People with ASD tend to get hyper-focused on one (often very specific) hobby. "For example, I had an adult who was very into bugs," Martinez says. And I used to babysit a little boy with ASD who was super into trains. This intense love for one area or interest can be a dead giveaway that a person is on the spectrum.

4. They Probably Don't Have Much Tolerance For Flexibility

Nobody likes it when their plans go awry, but people with ASD will be very bothered by it. This is mostly due to their strict, inflexible, and repetitive way of doing things, according to autism expert Lisa Jo Rudy on VeryWell.com. Having to do a work project in an unexpected way, for instance, will leave them feeling overwhelmed and upset.

5. Small Talk Might Be A Struggle

Elevator rides with strangers, one-on-ones at parties, first dates — these are situations that people with ASD dread. That's mostly because these situations involve small talk, which, according to Rudy, can be a tricky thing for those on the spectrum.

6. Change Really, Truly Sucks

In the same way people with ASD don't like their plans messed with, they also don't respond well to other forms of change. "They are often rigid and respond poorly to change in routine or attempts to interfere with their objects of interest," Barton said.

7. Making Friends Is Often Not Easy

It's not impossible for people with AS to make friends. In fact, one of my besties has ASD and they are as nice and supportive (if not more) as my other friends. But, according to Rudy, making friends is a problem that exists for many people on the spectrum.

8. Finding An SO Might Prove Difficult

"Getting a romantic partner who has that same interest, and is willing to focus on [a narrow] subject . can be difficult, "Martinez says. As is finding someone who fully understands what this whole "autism" thing is all about. As with friendships, it's not impossible for people with ASD to snag a partner. But it can be more difficult for them.

9. Focusing Is Rarely A Problem

Those who are on the spectrum will have an impressive ability to focus on a task — sometimes for very long periods of time, according to Rudy. I've seen this in my friend who can play a game or listen to music for way longer than anyone else I know.

10. Conversations Can Be A Bit One-Sided

Because recognizing emotions in others is a challenge, people with ASD tend to have one-sided conversations, according to AutismSpeaks.org. It's not that they are being rude. It's just how their brain works.

11. Eye Contact Issues Are Common

People with ASD often struggle to make eye contact, so you might notice your friend or coworker averting his or her eyes, or looking off into the distance. They might also have some awkward movements or mannerisms, according to AutismSpeaks.org.

So, there you have it — many of the traits of people with Autism Spectrum Disorder. If this lists describes you, then you might be having an eye-opening moment right now. But, at the very least, the list will be super helpful to finally understand and recognize the symptoms in someone else.


Why It's Hard To Keep A Job When You Have Asperger's

Most people with Asperger&rsquos do not look disabled. We seem &ldquooff,&rdquo sure. But not to the point where we can&rsquot work full-time.

But a lot of us can&rsquot. And here&rsquos why.

You start out upbeat. You were excited about this. You got through the interview just fine because you were so happy to be there. They might have even called you a good communicator.

You chat with your coworkers. People compliment your work. You might miss a few things, but you&rsquore doing such a good job that they forgive you for it. People help you when you can&rsquot do something.

As the work piles on, you start making mistakes. You lose something. You send a poorly-worded email. You realize that everyone is working faster than you are.

The multitasking is killing you. You ask your supervisor for help. You&rsquove been asking her that a lot by the way. Especially with sequential tasks. And she&rsquos getting annoyed. She says you need to &ldquowork more independently.&rdquo

If you do your work without help, she says you need to &ldquoshow more initiative.&rdquo

Either way, you are clearly not handling this well.

You don&rsquot make small talk anymore. You don&rsquot have the energy for it. Those people who were so nice to you at first are now starting to avoid you. The important assignments are now given to somebody else.

You know you look disinterested. And vaguely creepy. But you also know there&rsquos not a damn thing you can do about it.

You&rsquore also getting less sleep than you used to. Which means you can&rsquot focus. Before you had this job you used your free time to recuperate. Now you have to spend it on chores.

Not to mention that a lot of us have executive functioning issues that make household tasks like balancing a checkbook exhausting. Chores are the things we need to recuperate from. Let alone getting yelled at because we typed in the wrong numbers on a spreadsheet.

If you have friends, you don&rsquot see them much. Which makes everything worse. You feel worthless at your job. Your friends make you feel like you have value.

But you can&rsquot talk to them because you&rsquore always so fucking tired.

You start calling in sick. You need to sleep. You might even fall asleep at work. When people aren&rsquot avoiding you, they look vaguely concerned about you. You look sick.

One step at a time, you tell yourself. I&rsquoll do one step at a time just to get through the day. Nobody confronts you about your performance. But you have a feeling it&rsquos worse than you think.

You&rsquore too exhausted to regulate your social behavior. You start stimming. You wring your hands or twirl your hair. You stare at people when you&rsquore tired. You stare them down while you&rsquore stimming.

No one speaks to you. You don&rsquot blame them at this point. You look creepy as shit. All the time.

You make a big mistake. Like misquoting somebody if you&rsquore in media. Or a giant glitch in programming that causes someone to lose money. You say the wrong thing to a very wrong person.

Or maybe it&rsquos just a ton of little mistakes that just keep adding up.

You might quit due to exhaustion. A lot of us work for a while and then not, going through phases of high hopes and then complete fucking burnout.


How is Asperger syndrome managed?

Your child's healthcare provider may talk to you about levels of support for your child. This is based on challenges your child has with social skills, communication, and repeated behaviors. The level of support ranges from 1 to 3. Level 3 is the most support needed.

  • Early intervention may help your child learn and keep new skills. Early intervention begins before your child is 3 years old. Intervention may need to change many times during your child's life to help fit his or her needs. Providers will work with you and everyone who takes care of your child. This will help make sure everyone knows how to support your child.
  • Therapy may be recommended. The goal of therapy is to help your child feel confident and supported. Support may include social skill, behavior, speech, or physical therapy. Therapy may also help your child tolerate certain sounds and smells more easily.
  • Medicines may be needed. Medicines may be given to help decrease anxiety, repeated behaviors, or anger. Some children with Asperger syndrome also have seizures. Your child may need medicine to control or prevent seizures.

Do you ever self analyze your own psychology?

It is one of the reasons talk therapy never worked for me. When I had my neuropsych eval the doctor commented on my high level of self-awareness and introspection. I dislike it sometimes because it means I am aware enough to realize when I struggle with things but still cant help it.

For example, I have a habit of waiting at crosswalks for the walk sign. No matter what. For context I live in Boston. I am aware I am doing it when I do it but still can't help do it.

My level of self awareness is so high that its depressing because when I look around, seems like nobody else does the same or realizes the same things either for themselves of how they come across to others. I actually had an in depth convo about it with my dad because it is something im interested in paying attention to and I like to try and run the idea across some people to get then to look within sometimes. Never works.

Doctor: “have you tried fixing it? You’re aware it exists so. fix it.”

Me: “yeah I can’t do that. I know it exists, but I can’t fix it’s existence.”

As an aside, I love the "for context, I live in Boston" since we'll just walk into the road anywhere here.

Every. Damn. Therapist. Every time.

Why can't you do anything to help it - have you tried?

i have been in the same boat! However, what I have found is that this just means we are not the unified coherent self that we would like ourselves to be. There are at least three parts of self at work- a part that is cognizant of social cues and of how to act and that is actively trying to get you to follow them. There is another part that is not listening to reason very well. I imagine this part is trying to keep you safe. There is a third part monitoring this exchange.

I can relate. My last therapist says I'm meta-cognizant, introspective, self-aware and emotionally intelligent. She would constantly ask me why I'm in therapy or what I want to achieve. It bothered me, I've been told on Reddit how you can go into therapy for anything. I wanted to work on recognizing my emotions before they can "burn" me. She claimed I'm already doing that, etc. Not sure if a new therapist would help. I'm sure a therapist wouldn't say therapy is "impossible" on people like us. I wonder what they meant.


The Five Types Of Asperger's

It still pisses me off that the DSM5 got rid of Asperger&rsquos. Not only is Asperger&rsquos it&rsquos own thing (repetitive behaviors & special interestsyou guys!) but there&rsquos differentlevels of it. There areso many genes that go into autism that it might even be split into several different disorders someday. Here&rsquos a totallyunscientific set of types based on aspies I&rsquove known:

Impulsive (aka Party Crasher)

These aspies are run by their ids. They&rsquore the most high-energy and the most likely to blurt out rude shit.Most prone to repetitive behaviors. Also more likely to showtheir feelings than other types. Prone to addictions from Internet browsing to heroin. They usually have more social awareness than they&rsquore given credit for. They can evenbe charismatic for short periods of time, which makes sense because they&rsquore generally the most social. But they&rsquore the hardest aspies to spend extended periods of time with. They used to let their inner monologue run wild when they were younger, driving people away. They may or may not have learned better. Most have developed some pride in their inadvertent &ldquotell it like it is&rdquo attitude, whichis appreciated by certain people. Misdiagnoses include ADHD, bipolar disorder, & borderline.

Methodical (aka Patrick Bateman)

These aspies study the social world long and hard. They&rsquore generally pretty touchy, having very specific ideas about what&rsquos good and what isn&rsquot. The most outwardly adept of the bunch, they can hold jobs and sustain friendships longer than other types. High IQs. High intensity. Repetitive behaviors. Wry conversationalists. Like to control their environment. Theirsperg finally showswhen you notice the studied aspect of their interactions. Plus their obsessive special interests, which they&rsquore among the most likely to have. May be misdiagnosed with OCD or a personality disorder. I think these aspies are mostly men.

Sluggish (aka Stealth)

The low-energy type. They have the most sensory problems, but those sensory sensitivities can also bring them plenty of joy. They might have a better sense of smell, taste, and touch than most people. They get overwhelmed the most easily and it takes them the longest to recharge after any possible exertion. They generally don&rsquot talk much.They have trouble articulating their thoughts to words. They have trouble with employment too. But to make up for all that they often have the most situational awareness of all types. They might even be street smart. That astuteness takes them ten times more energy than it takes everyone else, which is one reason they&rsquore so tired. They might be misdiagnosed with ADD, hearing problems, schizophrenia, or a less intelligent form of autism.

Studious (aka Wedgie)

The prototypical Asperger. These people are usually smart, well-read, and mild-mannered.They&rsquore the most noticeably intelligent of all types and they havethe least awareness. They get taken advantage of easily. But they&rsquore more adaptable than other types. Likely to work in tech. But they may also be found in teaching or helping professions. They have patience, discipline, and a drive towards mastery. Usually loyal to a fault. They were made fun of when they were younger, but now people like having them around.They make friends through either special interests or sheer wholesomeness. May have a good sense of humor. Common misdiagnoses include ADHD, OCD, and major depression.

Masked (aka Good Actress)

The least obvious aspies. They don&rsquot have blunt tells like repetitive behaviors or big mouths, at least not in front of other people. It surprises people when these aspies slip up. Generally the most empathetic type, they havedecently developedtheory of mind skills but might also be gullible at unfortunate times. Peopleget protective of them without knowing why. They&rsquore popular by aspie standards, because they&rsquove learned how to be good conversationalists and good listeners. Chances are they were eitherdiagnosed late or so early that they&rsquove gotten every kind of help possible. They might be misdiagnosed with ADHD, OCD, eating disorders, or major depression. I think these are mostly women.

I&rsquom an Impulsive and myboyfriend&rsquos a Sluggish. But I&rsquove dated all of them. Especially Methodicals. If you don&rsquot like yourself on here you might be able to change with time. It&rsquos like the Myers-Briggs for spergs.


Traits Of People Who May Have Asperger Syndrome

Some people who are on the autism spectrum go through life without anyone noticing. They may seem a bit "strange," or have some odd interests. For the most part, however, they blend right on in with the rest of the society. But there are also the people who display more traits of Asperger Syndrome, and these people — your friend, your coworker, your SO, your neighbor — tend to stand out a bit more.

"Typically, the defining factor in someone who has Asperger's . is a lack of social skills," says Nicole Martinez, Psy.D., LCPC, in an email to Bustle. "They. are brilliant, but just 'aren't people persons.'" To everyone else, this might look like they have a case of the awkwards, or a total lack of desire (or inability) to make eye contact.

And this is where Asperger's often gets confused with autism. "Autism is a more debilitating disorder, with a far worse prognosis depending on severity of symptoms and intervention timing," Dr. Michele Barton tells me via email. "Asperger's is far less severe and has a much better prognosis. Individuals often go on to live acceptable mainstream lifestyles."

Due to these differences, the terminology has recently changed. "Asperger's is now grouped among other syndromes that fall on the same continuum termed Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)," Barton explains. "Individuals formerly diagnosed with Asperger's are now diagnosed as High Functioning ASD." Read on to learn more about these ASD traits, so you can better understand what it looks like.

1. They'll May Have Difficulty Reading Other People's Emotions

If someone is on the autism spectrum, one of their defining characteristics will be a decided lack of social skills. "They struggle in this area," Martinez says. "They have difficulty reading other people's emotions, facial expressions, and how they should respond in emotional situations." It can make social gatherings, or even the simplest of convos, feel kinda awkward.

2. Articulate People Are Often Their BFFs

Since reading emotions is sort of a no-go, younger people with ASD will often turn to people they can relate to verbally. As Barton says, "Social situations are hard to navigate as they are not very receptive to expressive and emotional cues. So, from a young age they enjoy the company of more verbally articulate adults or older children."

3. They May Have A Narrow Range Of Interests

People with ASD tend to get hyper-focused on one (often very specific) hobby. "For example, I had an adult who was very into bugs," Martinez says. And I used to babysit a little boy with ASD who was super into trains. This intense love for one area or interest can be a dead giveaway that a person is on the spectrum.

4. They Probably Don't Have Much Tolerance For Flexibility

Nobody likes it when their plans go awry, but people with ASD will be very bothered by it. This is mostly due to their strict, inflexible, and repetitive way of doing things, according to autism expert Lisa Jo Rudy on VeryWell.com. Having to do a work project in an unexpected way, for instance, will leave them feeling overwhelmed and upset.

5. Small Talk Might Be A Struggle

Elevator rides with strangers, one-on-ones at parties, first dates — these are situations that people with ASD dread. That's mostly because these situations involve small talk, which, according to Rudy, can be a tricky thing for those on the spectrum.

6. Change Really, Truly Sucks

In the same way people with ASD don't like their plans messed with, they also don't respond well to other forms of change. "They are often rigid and respond poorly to change in routine or attempts to interfere with their objects of interest," Barton said.

7. Making Friends Is Often Not Easy

It's not impossible for people with AS to make friends. In fact, one of my besties has ASD and they are as nice and supportive (if not more) as my other friends. But, according to Rudy, making friends is a problem that exists for many people on the spectrum.

8. Finding An SO Might Prove Difficult

"Getting a romantic partner who has that same interest, and is willing to focus on [a narrow] subject . can be difficult, "Martinez says. As is finding someone who fully understands what this whole "autism" thing is all about. As with friendships, it's not impossible for people with ASD to snag a partner. But it can be more difficult for them.

9. Focusing Is Rarely A Problem

Those who are on the spectrum will have an impressive ability to focus on a task — sometimes for very long periods of time, according to Rudy. I've seen this in my friend who can play a game or listen to music for way longer than anyone else I know.

10. Conversations Can Be A Bit One-Sided

Because recognizing emotions in others is a challenge, people with ASD tend to have one-sided conversations, according to AutismSpeaks.org. It's not that they are being rude. It's just how their brain works.

11. Eye Contact Issues Are Common

People with ASD often struggle to make eye contact, so you might notice your friend or coworker averting his or her eyes, or looking off into the distance. They might also have some awkward movements or mannerisms, according to AutismSpeaks.org.

So, there you have it — many of the traits of people with Autism Spectrum Disorder. If this lists describes you, then you might be having an eye-opening moment right now. But, at the very least, the list will be super helpful to finally understand and recognize the symptoms in someone else.


Reviews & endorsements

"The subject of this delightful book is the most important in child psychiatry and possibly in medicine, because at issue is the essence of our human nature. Buy Frith's book as a treat, read it, and send it to an editor as a reminder that brevity is not always beneficial it took Asperger sixty pages to make his point, and Kanner thirty-three." The Lancet

"Uta Frith not only provides the first-ever translation into English of Asperger's paper, but has brought together a variety of fascinating phenomenological and narrative accounts of the syndrome and its varied presentations. Autism and Asperger Syndrome is an invaluable book, not only for researchers, therapists and clinicians, but for parents and teachers, for everyone concerned with understanding autism, and seeing its clinical and its human dimension too." Oliver Sacks

". highly recommended to a variety of readers, including medical and behavioural scientists, parents, friends and even sufferers from Asperger's syndrome. It is clear, succinct and so far unique in its presentation of important findings relating to this impairment." Nature

"The strength of this book is in its rich description of the range of behaviors that characterize autistic spectrum disorders and in the review of the links between social deficits in these disorders and possible underlying cognitive mechanisms. a well written, thoughtful, and interesting text that is well worth reading." Joseph Piven, American Journal of Psychiatry

"I found the text informative and fascinating. Its specificity, clarity, and depth make Autism and Asperger Syndrome the best reference we have found about the syndrome." Whole Earth Review

"This book provides an in-depth analysis on Asperger's, autism and how the two are related." Columbia, MO, Missourian


10 Symptoms of High-Functioning Autism

Diagnosis rates for autism continue to rise, especially as parents and professionals become more familiar with the symptoms of high-functioning autism. Many patients are getting the assistance they need to live full, productive lives because their unusual behaviors are no longer seen as simple social awkwardness or eccentricity. As more caring medical and mental health professionals learn to recognize the most common symptoms of autism, the number of interventions available to people with autism will rise.

Emotional Sensitivity

Although often overlooked, sensitivity to emotions is a common issue for people on the high end of the autism spectrum. These individuals can function in day-to-day life but struggle to control their emotions the same way that neurotypical, or non-autistic people, are able to do. For example, a frustrating morning experience like running out of milk or being cut off while driving can cause irritability and difficulty concentrating for the rest of the day. People with autism may also have unusually intense emotional reactions compared to the rest of the population.

Fixation on Particular Subjects or Ideas

Continually discussing the same topics in conversation, obsessively playing the same song repeatedly, or reading every article written about a certain topic are some ways that autistic fixations can manifest. These interests can be negative if they take over the individual’s life or interfere with their relationships with others. Of course, these obsessive tendencies can also be helpful Dan Aykroyd, writer and star in the hit film Ghostbusters, was inspired by his focus on ghosts and the paranormal. Many other high-functioning autistic individuals have used their focus on mathematics, biology, or writing to inspire successful careers.

Linguistic Oddities

Children on the low-functioning end of the autism spectrum usually struggle with learning to speak, building vocabulary and holding conversations with others. Their counterparts on the higher end of the spectrum may start talking much earlier than normal and often display an impressive vocabulary. They may find conversations with others boring or difficult to follow and may avoid speaking with their peers. Many people with mild autism may simply seem eccentric during conversations as their diverse vocabularies, frequent interruptions or focus on particular topics seem like oddities rather than neurological symptoms.

Social Difficulties

Parents and teachers may notice that young autistics have problems interacting with their peers. These symptoms of high-functioning autism in children and teenagers can include a limited social circle, problems sharing toys or materials, and difficulty completing group work. Sometimes youth are considered shy, quirky or socially awkward when they are truly dealing with autism and in need of counseling services to help them learn social rules, as the problems with interacting with others usually stem from a lack of understanding appropriate behavior with peers. Early intervention from mental health professionals can help autistic youth learn the best ways to interact with their classmates and potential friends.

Problems Processing Physical Sensations

Many individuals with autism have sensory difficulties. They may find specific noises, tastes, smells, or feelings intolerable. Noisy public places can lead to emotional distress, as can uncomfortable clothing or unwanted touches. These issues can be disruptive and stressful, but according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, autism symptoms can improve over time as children with mild autism learn to regulate their own behavior through work with professionals.

Devotion to Routines

People with high-functioning autism are typically devoted to routines. They may stick with routines developed for them by others, such as reading for exactly 15 minutes before going to bed or brushing their teeth exactly five minutes after eating a meal. Any sort of deviation from the routine, such as a parent needing to help a sick sibling at bedtime instead of reading to the affected individual could cause the person to become frustrated. The person with high-functioning autism may devote an exorbitant amount of time to performing their routines to the detriment of self-care, sleep, exercise, homework or learning.

Development of Repetitive or Restrictive Habits

Repetitive habits are another sign of high-functioning autism. Those habits could interfere with the person’s ability to do what they need to do or what others want them to do. One type of repetitive habit might be related to movement. The individual might have to tie and untie their shoes multiple times before they are satisfied and are able to start walking or leave the house. Some people develop restrictive habits that interfere with socially accepted living. For example, an individual might refuse to wear any other kind of shirt than a tee shirt. This could impact their health and well-being if they live in a place with cold weather.

Dislike of Change

A hallmark of high-functioning autism is a strong dislike of change. An individual might eat the same meal every day for breakfast, and they may eat it in the same quantity, on the same dish, and in the same place. Any disruption or change in the routine could cause an outburst in the individual. For example, if the usual brand of peanut butter has run out, and a different brand has been purchased instead, the person with high-functioning autism may have an outburst of anger or frustration. If someone has used their preferred dish, they may have a similar outpouring of volatility.

Focus on Self

People with high-functioning autism may have trouble developing deep social relationships with others. Part of this issue also includes an inordinate focus on self. A person with high-functioning autism may spend an excessive amount of time talking about themselves, not allowing another person to share a complete thought or response. This makes carrying on a conversation difficult. In the family or household setting, a person with high-functioning autism may only think of themselves when doing activities. For example, they might pour themselves a drink without asking if anyone else would also like a drink. They might take more than what others perceive as a fair share of a snack or treat, genuinely not thinking that others might also want some of the items.

Unusual Movement Patterns

A person with high-functioning autism may have unusual movement patterns. Toe walking is a common movement disorder. The person may walk on their toes or the ball and the toes of the feet without putting much bodyweight on the other parts of the foot. This can result in foot pain in the ball, hammertoe, or bunion from the excessive pressure. The shoes and socks may wear out in the forefoot area much faster than in the heel area. People who walk on their toes may experience more foot injuries, such as blisters, calluses, and corns on their footpads and toes. Toe walking is more common in young children and people with musculoskeletal, explains the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.

Not all individuals with autism exhibit physical tics or an inability to maintain social ties. People with high-functioning autism usually present symptoms not originally associated with autism, and helping professionals must continue to push for recognition of the range of behaviors associated with the autism spectrum. Familiarity with these ten symptoms of high-functioning autism helps providers, parents, teachers and others coordinate the early treatment of a person with this condition.


Why It's Hard To Keep A Job When You Have Asperger's

Most people with Asperger&rsquos do not look disabled. We seem &ldquooff,&rdquo sure. But not to the point where we can&rsquot work full-time.

But a lot of us can&rsquot. And here&rsquos why.

You start out upbeat. You were excited about this. You got through the interview just fine because you were so happy to be there. They might have even called you a good communicator.

You chat with your coworkers. People compliment your work. You might miss a few things, but you&rsquore doing such a good job that they forgive you for it. People help you when you can&rsquot do something.

As the work piles on, you start making mistakes. You lose something. You send a poorly-worded email. You realize that everyone is working faster than you are.

The multitasking is killing you. You ask your supervisor for help. You&rsquove been asking her that a lot by the way. Especially with sequential tasks. And she&rsquos getting annoyed. She says you need to &ldquowork more independently.&rdquo

If you do your work without help, she says you need to &ldquoshow more initiative.&rdquo

Either way, you are clearly not handling this well.

You don&rsquot make small talk anymore. You don&rsquot have the energy for it. Those people who were so nice to you at first are now starting to avoid you. The important assignments are now given to somebody else.

You know you look disinterested. And vaguely creepy. But you also know there&rsquos not a damn thing you can do about it.

You&rsquore also getting less sleep than you used to. Which means you can&rsquot focus. Before you had this job you used your free time to recuperate. Now you have to spend it on chores.

Not to mention that a lot of us have executive functioning issues that make household tasks like balancing a checkbook exhausting. Chores are the things we need to recuperate from. Let alone getting yelled at because we typed in the wrong numbers on a spreadsheet.

If you have friends, you don&rsquot see them much. Which makes everything worse. You feel worthless at your job. Your friends make you feel like you have value.

But you can&rsquot talk to them because you&rsquore always so fucking tired.

You start calling in sick. You need to sleep. You might even fall asleep at work. When people aren&rsquot avoiding you, they look vaguely concerned about you. You look sick.

One step at a time, you tell yourself. I&rsquoll do one step at a time just to get through the day. Nobody confronts you about your performance. But you have a feeling it&rsquos worse than you think.

You&rsquore too exhausted to regulate your social behavior. You start stimming. You wring your hands or twirl your hair. You stare at people when you&rsquore tired. You stare them down while you&rsquore stimming.

No one speaks to you. You don&rsquot blame them at this point. You look creepy as shit. All the time.

You make a big mistake. Like misquoting somebody if you&rsquore in media. Or a giant glitch in programming that causes someone to lose money. You say the wrong thing to a very wrong person.

Or maybe it&rsquos just a ton of little mistakes that just keep adding up.

You might quit due to exhaustion. A lot of us work for a while and then not, going through phases of high hopes and then complete fucking burnout.


How is Asperger syndrome managed?

Your child's healthcare provider may talk to you about levels of support for your child. This is based on challenges your child has with social skills, communication, and repeated behaviors. The level of support ranges from 1 to 3. Level 3 is the most support needed.

  • Early intervention may help your child learn and keep new skills. Early intervention begins before your child is 3 years old. Intervention may need to change many times during your child's life to help fit his or her needs. Providers will work with you and everyone who takes care of your child. This will help make sure everyone knows how to support your child.
  • Therapy may be recommended. The goal of therapy is to help your child feel confident and supported. Support may include social skill, behavior, speech, or physical therapy. Therapy may also help your child tolerate certain sounds and smells more easily.
  • Medicines may be needed. Medicines may be given to help decrease anxiety, repeated behaviors, or anger. Some children with Asperger syndrome also have seizures. Your child may need medicine to control or prevent seizures.

5 Strengths Necessary for Success as a School Psychologist

A school psychologist works in the educational system and offers assistance to children who suffer social, emotional, and academic problems. Since each student is different, an individual approach is necessary to promote a healthy environment for learning. A person following this career path must possess five key strengths for success.

1. Knows How to Deal with Emotions

A student may consult with a school psychologist for a number of reasons. Besides academic problems, this professional helps a child deal with emotional issues. Oftentimes, a student’s negative classroom behavior is a manifestation of a troubled home life. A child does not have to suffer abuse to become withdrawn or violent. A divorce, death in the family, or other issue may cause a student to display a wide range of emotions. A child may be angry, sad, or display flashes of rage at school. It is up to the psychologist to uncover the root of the problem and provide other outlets for the child to manage his or her feelings.

2. Has an Approachable Personality

A child is often afraid to confide in a strange adult. A school psychologist must present an approachable personality that welcomes everyone. If a child does not feel safe, he or he will not openly discuss private issues. The best way to seem inviting to a child is to share personal information. Stories help a child relate to an adult and build trust. It may get a student comfortable enough to tell stories as well. A school psychologist listens well and reads between the lines to assess emotions. When a child realizes it is safe to trust the psychologist, he or she will feel free to visit whenever there is a problem.

3. Knows How to Train Parents and Faculty

School psychologists spend a majority of time dealing with students. They are also responsible for training teachers and parents how to get through times of crisis and how to deal with issues like substance abuse. These professionals act as a school’s cornerstone for intervention.

For example, today’s headlines are filled with stories of school shootings. Psychologists meet with students to discuss these types of situations and help them deal with the emotional aftermath.

School psychologists try to educate parents and faculty about substance abuse issues as well. They explain how to recognize signs of problems and how to get children the help they need.

4. Is Creative

A school psychologist is responsible for developing programs that help students overcome learning barriers. After analyzing certain test results, a psychologist must work with teachers to create activities that stimulate learning. When a child is interested in school, he or she is likely to participate and retain as much information as possible. It is also a psychologist’s job to evaluate the effectiveness of academic programs already in existence and to make changes when necessary.

If a student with learning difficulties is detected, a psychologist must design a program to encourage academic success. Since each child is different, it takes creativity to implement a strategy that works well.

5. Appreciates and Encourages Diversity

Most schools have students of different races and religions. Since this can be a basis for strife, a school psychologist must nip trouble in the bud and establish a place where everyone is viewed as equal. This professional must embrace diversity and help foster tolerance among the classrooms. Learning about various cultures helps students appreciate their differences and come together as a cohesive unit. This keeps the school safe and maintains a place that is conducive to learning.

School psychology is a good career choice for a person who wants to work in an educational setting to help parents and teachers create the best environment for learning. It is a promising field for an individual looking to help children reach their full potentials.


Conclusion

This information on the three types of autism spectrum disorder can help you understand individuals with autism better. More and more information has come to light about autism in recent decades due to new research, shedding insight on the symptoms, unique characteristics, and treatment modalities of this disorder. While more research still needs to be done on treatments and interventions for those with autism, we know a vast amount more than we did in the recent past. Those with either type of autism spectrum disorder can live a full and happy life however, some need an early diagnosis as well as ABA interventions put in place to ensure success in the critical areas of need. If you suspect a child has a type of ASD, please pass your observations along to the teacher, parent, school nurse, clinician, etc. Intervening early is the key.